Free Download: 2014 Benefits Guide for Seniors: NYC

NYC Department of Aging, senior citizens, aarp
Free download. NYC Department of Aging resources. Free benefits guide for senior citizens.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For 2014, this guide from NYY.gov  is a helpful resource for benefits available to senior citizens of New York.

Table of contents include:

Social Security 1

Supplemental Security Income 2

Veterans Benefits 3

New York Prescription Saver Card 3

Public Assistance 4

Medicare 5

Medicare Savings Program 6

Medicare Part D 7

Affordable Care Act 7

Medicaid 8

Food Stamps (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance 9 Program SNAP)

Reduced Fare 10 Senior Citizen Rent Increase Exemption (SCRIE) 11

Senior Citizen Homeowners Exemption (SCHE) 12

Real Property Tax Credit (IT-214) 13

Home Energy Assistance Program (HEAP) 14

Heating Equipment Repair or Replacement 15

Elderly Pharmaceutical Insurance Coverage (EPIC) 15

New York State School Tax Relief Program (STAR) 16 

Regards, Brian

info@raphanlaw.com

 

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Some FAQ’s about Health Care Proxys

As an Elder Law attorney  for over 25 years  I have recently been getting more and more questions about Health Care Proxys. Below are some answers as well as a link to a Free Sample Draft so my readers can see what it’s all about:

 Why you need a will
Living Will
 

What is a Health Care Proxy?

A Health Care Proxy is someone you appoint to make health related decisions for you, in the event you can not.

Who decides that I’m not able to make my own healthcare decisions?

Your attending physician will decide whether you lack the capacity to make health care decisions. The decision is made in writing. A second doctor also must be consulted in the case of decisions to withdraw or withhold life-sustaining treatment.  You will be given notice of these decisions if there is any indication that you can understand it. If you object to this decision or to a decision made by your agent, your objection or decision will prevail unless a court determines that you are unable to make health care decisions.

 

What if I recover the ability to make my own healthcare decisions?

Your doctor is required to decide whether you can make your own health care decisions and confirm it in writing each time your doctor plans on acting on your agent’s health care decisions. If you have recovered the ability to make your own decisions, your agent will not be able to make any more decision for your unless you again lose the abilities to make them. 

 

How do I complete a Healthcare Proxy?

In New York State, laws set forth the requirements for completing a health care proxy. You must be at least 18 years old and have the capacity to make your own decisions at the time you complete the proxy.

You must state your name and the name of the person you want to act as your agent, and state that your want the agent to have the authority to make health care decisions for you. You also must sign and date your health care proxy in the presence of two adult witnesses who are not names as your agent and have the witnesses sign the proxy. Please note that there are also special rules for the execution of a proxy by residents of psychiatric facilities.

Please note that you do not need to have a lawyer draft your health care proxy, however, you may wish to consult with a lawyer for advice about a health care proxy.

 

When will my Healthcare Proxy end?

You can create a proxy that lasts for a limited period of time by including in the document the dates you want the proxy to be valid. You can also revoke your proxy if you wish and you are competent to do so.

If you have appointed your husband or wife as your agent, and then you divorce or legally separate, the appointment will be revoked unless you specify that you do not wish to revoke it. You should review your proxy periodically to be sure that it continues to reflect your wishes. 

 

 Where should I keep my Proxy?

It’s best to give a copy of your proxy to your doctor as well as to the agent named in your proxy. If you revoke your proxy, be sure to notify whomever you gave a copy of the proxy. Upon entering a hospital you may give it to an administrator in charge, as your doctor, or attending physician may not be there when you arrive. Also, keep a copy with your other important documents such as a Power of Attorney and Will. All should be reviewed every couple of years.

What if I don’t want a Healthcare Proxy?

You can’t be required to execute a health care proxy as a condition of receiving health care services or insurance. Also, the lack of a health care proxy or other specific instructions does not crate any presumptions regarding your wishes about health care.

If you have any questions feel free to contact me! You can also visit this page on our website and download a FREE SAMPLE DRAFT of a health care proxy.

Regards, Brian

info@RaphanLaw.com

The Law Offices of Brian A. Raphan, P.C.

7 Penn Plaza, New York, NY 10001

Court Ruling: Transfers Made Years Before Needing Care Were Not Made in Order to Qualify for Medicaid

Doing Medicaid Planning for clients, I often get asked the question: “How does medicaid determine if my gifts were made to qualify for medicaid or not?” Saavy clients have a long history of gifting to show a pattern meant for gifting not medicaid spend down. This recent decision should be of interest.

medicaid planning, appeal
http://www.raphanlaw.com

A New York appeals court holds that a Medicaid applicant who transferred funds several years before needing long-term care and kept enough resources to care for herself rebutted the presumption that the transfers were made in order to qualify for Medicaid. Safran v. Shah (N.Y. Sup. Ct., App. Div., 2nd. Dept., 2013-04373, 20166/12, July 2, 2014).

While she was living independently and didn’t require long-term care, Louise Kornhaber transferred funds to her family as gifts. Several years later, Ms. Kornhaber entered a nursing home. Due to the unexpected theft of her remaining resources, Ms. Kornhaber applied for Medicaid. The state assessed a penalty period based on the uncompensated transfers.

Ms. Kornhaber appealed, arguing that the transfers were made for a reason other than to qualify for Medicaid. The state affirmed the penalty period, and Ms. Kornhaber appealed to court.

The New York Supreme Court, Appellate Division, orders the state to provide Ms. Kornhaber with Medicaid benefits, holding that the penalty period was not appropriate. The court rules that because Ms. Kornhaber still had enough resources to maintain herself for years after she made the transfers, she rebutted the presumption that the transfer was made in order to qualify for Medicaid.

Medicaid Planning takes the experience and legal expertise of a qualified attorney. The detailed process of medicaid planning needs to avoid errors and mistakes that can make you ineligible of cost you possibly tens of thousands of dollars in delays or penalties. Click here to read: 8  Medicaid Mistakes to Avoid,

For the full text of this decision, go to: https://www.nycourts.gov/reporter/3dseries/2014/2014_04943.htm

Any questions? Send me an email: info@raphanlaw.com or call 212-268-8200 during the day for a free consultation.

Regards, Brian

Heir Liable for Reimbursement of Mother’s Medicaid Expenses

medicare denialA California appeals court rules that the heir of an estate who sold her interest in her mother’s house to her brother is liable to the state for reimbursement of her mother’s Medicaid expensesEstate of Mays (Cal. App., 3d, No. C070568, June 30, 2014).

Medi-Cal (Medicaid) recipient Merver Mays died, leaving her house as her only asset. Ms. Mays’ daughter, Betty Bedford, petitioned the court to be appointed administrator of the estate, but she was never formally appointed because she didn’t pay the surety bond. The state filed a creditor’s claim against the estate for reimbursement of Medi-Cal expenses, and the court determined the claim was valid.  A dispute arose between Ms. Bedford and her brother, Roy Flemons, over ownership of the house. After the court determined Mr. Flemons owned a one-half interest in the property, Ms. Bedford and Mr. Flemons entered into an agreement in which Mr. Flemons paid Ms. Bedford $75,000 and transferred the house to his name.

The state petitioned the court for an order requiring Ms. Bedford to account for her administration of Ms. Mays’s estate. The court determined Ms. Bedford was liable to the state for the amount she received from Mr. Flemons because although she wasn’t formally appointed administrator, she was acting as administrator. Ms. Bedford appealed.

The California Court of Appeal, 3rd Appellate District, affirms on different grounds. The court rules that Ms. Bedford cannot be held liable due to her failure as administrator of the estate because she was never formally appointed administrator. However, the court holds that Ms. Bedford is liable as an heir of the estate who received estate property. According to the court, Ms. Bedford’s settlement with Mr. Flemons was “essentially an end-run around the creditor’s claim and the estate process” and “the $75,000 payment represented proceeds of the estate that would otherwise be available to satisfy creditors’ claims.”

Planning wisely, accurate and legally is key in Medicaid Planning. Make sure you use an attorney with experience, knowledge and is extremely familiar with rules in your state. Read 8 Medicaid Planning Mistakes to Avoid by clicking here.  You can also download a FREE GUIDE to Medicaid’s Asset Transfer Rules on the right hand column of this page on my website.

If you have any questions regarding Medicaid Planning feel free to give me a call.

Regards, Brian

212-268-8200  www.RaphanLaw.com