New Lawsuits for Pharmaceutical side effects & Medical Devices

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Our firm has become aware of concerning pharmaceutical and medical device side effects that may have impacted you, a friend or family member. If you or a loved one has been affected by any of these drugs or devices, please feel free to contact us to learn more about your legal rights and a possible monetary settlement. After receiving calls for legal help from some of our clients we are now working with a national law firm who specializes in litigation against large manufacturers of these products in an effort to hold them accountable for failing to warn patients of dangerous side effects. Below is a list of drugs and devices:

Xarelto—this medication is a blood thinner that can lead to serious and uncontrollable internal bleeding.

Testosterone Supplements–can bring on a heart attack or stroke, or cause deep vein thrombosis, DVT, blood clots, pulmonary embolism.

Risperdal—is an anti-psychotic medication marketed for use in children with ADD and other behavior disorders and is known it cause breast growth in prepubescent males, a condition known as gynecomastia.

Bard Inferior Vena Cava Filters—these devices are intended to stop blood clots traveling from the lower body to the heart and/or lungs, however they can break off and migrate into the heart, lungs, and other vital organs resulting in serious injury or death.

Potiga—is a seizure epilepsy medication that can cause blindness and other eye problems in patients.

Benicar—prescribed to treat high blood pressure, this drug has been linked to a serious gastrointestinal condition known as sprue-like enteropathy; symptoms include excessive weight loss or chronic diarrhea.

We can help you and your loved ones with any legal matters arising from use of these dangerous drugs and medical devices. If you know of someone that has used these medications please forward the information and inform them of the dangers.

If you have any questions feel free to contact me. -Brian

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Maybe it’s time for a geriatric care manager

Geriatric care

Why do we hear so much about geriatric care management these days? It’s because there are so many benefits they can provide to seniors and care givers. Let’s first clarify the term: A professional Geriatric Care Manager (GCM) is a health and human services specialist who helps families who are caring for older relatives. The GCM is trained and experienced in any of several fields related to care management, including nursing, gerontology, social work, psychology, and logistics of health care and often finances relating to the elderly. They are trained to assess, plan, coordinate, monitor and provide services for the elderly and their families. Although not lawyers, they are often aware of legal issues elders may be soon facing.

The benefits to you, the child or care giver of the elder range from saving time (vetting out various needs), saving money (knowing financial pitfalls of some decisions in advance), making better care decisions (with insight from someone who has seen it all) and most importantly –reducing stress.  The stress of being alone in the decision making process, relief of now being informed about your various options and what may be right for the specific needs of the elder, ranging from doctor decisions, how to provide care, assisted living, home care and nursing care options. Doing it alone takes an enormous amount of time, energy, resources and self reliance.

According to Gladys Harris Geriatric Care Manager of The Olive Group, you may need a Geriatric Care Manager if:

•    A person has limited or no family support available

•    Family has just become involved with helping the individual and needs direction regarding available senior services

•    A person has multiple medical or psychological issues

•    A person is unable to live safely in his / her current environment

•    Family is either “burned out” or confused about care solutions

•    Family has a limited time and / or expertise in dealing with loved one’s chronic care needs

•    Family is at odds regarding care decisions

•    Individual is not pleased with current care providers and requires advocacy

•    Individual is confused regarding his / her own financial and / or legal situation

•    Family needs education and / or direction in dealing with behaviors associated with dementia

Gladys is a recommended resource of ours and helps families and elders in New Jersey. They offer a unique combination of compassion, knowledge, a ‘can-do’ attitude and a wide range of services which also include:

Solution Focused Counseling: Life transitions are a common reason for counseling. We focus on empowering individuals to find solutions in their life by figuring out what a person’s goals are, and supporting them to find ways to achieve those goals.

Care Coordination: Our holistic assessment includes a physical, psychological and social functioning evaluation of the older adult, as well as a home safety inspection. Based on the assessment, we will develop a customized client care plan to identify private and public resources available to support the older adult. We coordinate the support systems needed to keep the older adult safe and happy at home.

Wellness Monitoring: Regular visits with the older adult to help ensure that they receive the best care available. During our visits we ensure older adults are receiving help with things that they want done, computer skills, organize photos, plan family events, etc.

Accessibility Issue Resolution: Aging-in-place often requires making changes to the home to help maintain independence.  This may be de-cluttering, home improvements, home safety inspection

Relocation Services: We support families during transitions from home to another location or facility.   These services include cleaning, de-cluttering, downsizing, and setting up in the older adult’s new home.

Cost savings is also a key component to good geriatric care management. You can learn more about it and find out more about the range of services by clicking here: www.TheOliveGroup.llc.com

Regards,

Brian

Three Reasons Why Joint Accounts May Be a Poor Estate Plan

Many people, especially seniors, see joint ownership of investment and bank accounts as a cheap and easy way to avoid probate since joint property passes automatically to the joint owner at death. Joint ownership can also be an easy way to plan for incapacity since the joint owner of accounts can pay bills and manage investments if the primary owner falls ill or suffers from dementia. These are all true benefits of joint ownership, but three potential drawbacks exist as well:

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  1. Risk. Joint owners of accounts have complete access and the ability to use the funds for their own purposes. Many elder law attorneys have seen children who are caring for their parents take money in payment without first making sure the amount is accepted by all the children. In addition, the funds are available to the creditors of all joint owners and could be considered as belonging to all joint owners should they apply for public benefits or financial aid.
  2. Inequity. If a senior has one or more children on certain accounts, but not all children, at her death some children may end up inheriting more than the others. While the senior may expect that all of the children will share equally, and often they do in such circumstances, there’s no guarantee. People with several children can maintain accounts with each, but they will have to constantly work to make sure the accounts are all at the same level, and there are no guarantees that this constant attention will work, especially if funds need to be drawn down to pay for care.
  3. The Unexpected. A system based on joint accounts can really fail if a child passes away before the parent. Then it may be necessary to seek conservatorship to manage the funds or they may ultimately pass to the surviving siblings with nothing or only a small portion going to the deceased child’s family. For example, a mother put her house in joint ownership with her son to avoid probate and Medicaid’s estate recovery claim. When the son died unexpectedly, the daughter-in-law was left high and dry despite having devoted the prior six years to caring for her husband’s mother.

Joint accounts do work well in two situations. First, when a senior has just one child and wants everything to go to him or her, joint accounts can be a simple way to provide for succession and asset management. It has some of the risks described above, but for many clients the risks are outweighed by the convenience of joint accounts.

Second, it can be useful to put one or more children on one’s checking account to pay customary bills and to have access to funds in the event of incapacity or death. Since these working accounts usually do not consist of the bulk of a client’s estate, the risks listed above are relatively minor.

For the rest of a senior’s assets, willstrusts and durable powers of attorney are much better planning tools. They do not put the senior’s assets at risk. They provide that the estate will be distributed as the senior wishes without constantly rejiggering account values or in the event of a child’s incapacity or death. And they provide for asset management in the event of the senior’s incapacity.

They provide that the estate will be distributed as the senior wishes without constantly rejiggering account values or in the event of a child’s incapacity or death. And they provide for asset management in the event of the senior’s incapacity.  To download a FREE GUIDE TO ESTATE PLANNING click here.

For more information about this article feel free to email me at info@raphanlaw.com

Regards, Brian

How Gifts Can Affect Medicaid Eligibility

We’ve all heard that it’s better to give than to receive, but if you think you might someday want to apply for Medicaid long-term care benefits, you need to be careful because giving away money or property can interfere with your eligibility. 

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Under federal Medicaid law, if you transfer certain assets within five years before applying for Medicaid, you will be ineligible for a period of time (called a transfer penalty), depending on how much money you transferred. Even small transfers can affect eligibility. While federal law allows individuals to gift up to $14,000 a year (in 2014) without having to pay a gift tax, Medicaid law still treats that gift as a transfer.

Any transfer that you make, however innocent, will come under scrutiny. For example, Medicaid does not have an exception for gifts to charities. If you give money to a charity, it could affect your Medicaid eligibility down the road. Similarly, gifts for holidays, weddings, birthdays, and graduations can all cause a transfer penalty. If you buy something for a friend or relative, this could also result in a transfer penalty.

Spending a lot of cash all at once or over time could prompt the state to request documentation showing how the money was spent. If you don’t have documentation showing that you received fair market value in return for a transferred asset, you could be subject to a transfer penalty.

While most transfers are penalized, certain transfers are exempt from this penalty. Even after entering a nursing home, you may transfer any asset to the following individuals without having to wait out a period of Medicaid ineligibility:

  • your spouse
  • your child who is blind or permanently disabled
  • a trust for the sole benefit of anyone under age 65 who is permanently disabled

In addition, you may transfer your home to the following individuals (as well as to those listed above):

  • your child who is under age 21
  • your child who has lived in your home for at least two years prior to your moving to a nursing home and who provided you with care that allowed you to stay at home during that time
  • a sibling who already has an equity interest in the house and who lived there for at least a year before you moved to a nursing home

Before giving away assets or property, check with your elder law attorney to ensure that it won’t affect your Medicaid eligibility.

For more information on Medicaid’s transfer rules, click here.