A Brothers’ Dispute Over Mother’s Nursing Home Placement Is Not Domestic Violence

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A New Jersey appeals court rules that an ugly dispute between two brothers over their mother’s placement in a nursing home did not amount to domestic violence. R.G. v. R.G.(N.J. Super. Ct., App. Div., No. A-0945-15T3, March 14, 2017).

R.G was the attorney-in-fact and primary caregiver for his parents. After R.G.’s mother fell ill, R.G. wanted to place his mother in a nursing home. R.G’s brother objected to this plan, but R.G. went ahead and had his mother admitted to a nursing home without his brother’s consent. R.G.’s brother sent angry and threatening texts and emails to R.G. as well as emails expressing his desire to find a way to care for their parents in their home. Eventually the men got into a physical altercation in which R.G.’s brother shoved R.G.

R.G. filed for a restraining order against his brother under the Prevention of Domestic Violence Act. The trial judge ruled that R.G. was harassed and assaulted and issued the restraining order. R.G.’s brother appealed, arguing that R.G. did not meet the definition of a victim of domestic violence.

The New Jersey Superior Court, Appellate Division, reverses, holding that R.G.’s brother’s actions did not amount to domestic violence. The court finds that there was insufficient evidence that R.G.’s brother purposely acted to harass R.G., ruling that “a mere expression of anger between persons in a requisite relationship is not an act of harassment.”

For the full text of this decision, go to: http://www.judiciary.state.nj.us/opinions/a0945-15.pdf

 

Elder Abuse is a National Epidemic

Via Huffington Post…

When Helping Hurts

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Elder abuse is a national epidemic. Each year in the United States, an estimated 10 percent of older Americans are injured physically, debilitated emotionally, exploited financially and/or neglected — often by an adult child, spouse, other relative or caregiver. Elder abuse victims have a three-fold risk of death compared to their non-abused counterparts. Frequently, an elder is isolated, their mistreatment hidden.

In 2006, newspapers around the country headlined the story that Brooke Astor, the legendary New York City philanthropist and socialite, was financially exploited and neglected by her son and attorney. The case attracted national attention as her grandson, with the help of others, sought elder justice – first, by petitioning for guardianship to help his grandmother and those who were (also) helping her, and second, to help bring some of her perpetrators (his father included) to justice. The Elder Abuse Unit of the New York County’s District Attorney’s Office indicted and convicted Brooke Astor’s son and attorney. Elder justice was realized.

That is rare. Most of the millions of elder abuse victims, their suffering shrouded in silence, do not receive justice. Only one in 24 elder abuse cases are reported to authorities. What is not rare is that, despite an almost total lack of support or resources, family, friends and neighbors step up to help. Yet helping hurts, as confirmed by new findings of our research.

 

Staggering Number Know About Elder Mistreatment, Assist Victims, and Feel Distress

Along with colleagues at Cornell University, University of Toronto and Purdue University, we utilized Cornell University’s Survey Research Institute’s omnibus survey to learn about these concerned persons who step up for elder abuse victims — a population that had never been assessed. The survey results were recently released in The Gerontologist. They show that when findings are extended to the general population (U.S. Census Bureau, 2016), approximately 73 million adult Americans have had personal knowledge of a victim of elder mistreatment. Further, approximately 44 million adult Americans have become involved in helping an elder abuse victim. And for over 32 million adult Americans, just knowing about an elder abuse situation is generally highly stressful. Actually providing help to the victim tends to intensify this personal distress.

We need more research to understand what specific aspects cause this distress. We do know from conversations with concerned persons that the path to assisting elder abuse victims is often fraught with challenges. Concerned persons may witness the decline in the victim’s health and seek to obtain medical care, or provide what care they can themselves. They might feverishly focus efforts on trying to stop a financial exploiter from completely emptying bank accounts. They may try to lessen the victim’s despair. Often, they are often the only ones standing between the victim and the abuser, preventing the victim from slipping into total isolation.

Yet they are usually wholly unprepared for how this intervention might take a toll on they themselves. Relationships with friends they confide in and family may become strained, sometimes to the breaking point. They may suffer financial consequences. And seeing or confronting an abuser can be dangerous, so they personally risk becoming the target of abuse. Intervening can take real courage, and even more to remain involved. And it requires time, as elder abuse cases tend not to resolve quickly. It is not surprising that concerned persons can experience anguish, frustration and trauma. Yet like the victims they help, they are largely invisible: their deeds often not recognized, their needs unacknowledged.

 

Communities Can Help

What can communities do? A new program to be launched this spring in New York City is a beginning. The New York City Elder Abuse Center is launching a pilot helpline for concerned persons assisting elder mistreatment victims residing in New York City. Funded in part by the Fan Fox & Leslie R. Samuels Foundation, it will provide information, referrals and support. This is an important first step, but the need is great. Programs must be developed for concerned persons — and elder abuse victims — in every community. This will require support from foundations, private philanthropists, businesses and government. Brooke Astor fervently believed in a collectively expressed philanthropy, a

Elder abuse is a national epidemic. Each year in the United States, an estimated 10 percent of older Americans are injured physically, debilitated emotionally, exploited financially and/or neglected — often by an adult child, spouse, other relative or caregiver. Elder abuse victims have a three-fold risk of death compared to their non-abused counterparts. Frequently, an elder is isolated, their mistreatment hidden.

In 2006, newspapers around the country headlined the story that Brooke Astor, the legendary New York City philanthropist and socialite, was financially exploited and neglected by her son and attorney. The case attracted national attention as her grandson, with the help of others, sought elder justice – first, by petitioning for guardianship to help his grandmother and those who were (also) helping her, and second, to help bring some of her perpetrators (his father included) to justice. The Elder Abuse Unit of the New York County’s District Attorney’s Office indicted and convicted Brooke Astor’s son and attorney. Elder justice was realized.

That is rare. Most of the millions of elder abuse victims, their suffering shrouded in silence, do not receive justice. Only one in 24 elder abuse cases are reported to authorities. What is not rare is that, despite an almost total lack of support or resources, family, friends and neighbors step up to help. Yet helping hurts, as confirmed by new findings of our research.

 

5 Great Tax Deductions and Credits for Retirees

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Via Tina Orem, Nerdwallet

They say that with age comes wisdom. But with age also come a few tax perks.

Once your birthday cake has 50 candles on it, the IRS starts to lighten up a bit. And when you hit 65, the IRS has a few more small presents for you — if you know where to look. Here are five tax deductions and credits you don’t want to miss after you’ve blown out all those candles.

1. A higher standard deduction

If you take the standard deduction instead of itemizing (learn how to decide here), you get a bonus of up to $1,500 if you or your spouse is 65 or older.

Filing status Regular standard deduction Standard deduction, age 65+
Single $6,300 $7,850
Married, filing jointly $12,600 $13,850
Married, filing separately $6,300 $7,550
Head of household $9,300 $10,800

If you or your spouse is legally blind, your standard deduction can increase an additional $1,250.

2. More room to shelter income

Because contributions to a 401(k) are tax-advantaged, the IRS limits how much you can contribute each year. For folks under 50, that limit is $18,000. If you’re over 50, though, you can put in $24,000 per year.

But alas, that assumes that you’re still working and that your employer offers a 401(k) plan.

If you’ve already kissed your cubicle goodbye, you may still be able to contribute an extra $1,000 a year to a traditional IRA or a Roth IRA, if you qualify for a Roth. That’s thanks to the IRS’ catch-up provision for people 50 and older. And remember, you can put money into a traditional IRA until the year you reach age 70½; there’s no age limit on Roth IRA contributions.

» MORE: Traditional IRAs vs. Roth IRAs

3. A bigger deduction for medical expenses

If you itemize, you can deduct unreimbursed medical expenses — but only the amount that exceeds 10% of your adjusted gross income. For example, if your adjusted gross income is $40,000, the threshold is $4,000, meaning that if you rang up $10,000 in medical bills, you could deduct $6,000 of it.

If you or your spouse is 65 or older, however, that 10% threshold dips to 7.5% for the 2016 tax year — netting you a bigger deduction. So for that hypothetical $10,000 in medical bills, that means you could deduct $7,000 instead of $6,000. (Beware, though: the threshold is set to rise to 10% in 2017 unless Congress takes action.)

And if you’ve recently purchased long-term care insurance, you may be able to add in $380 to $4,750 of the premiums, depending on your age (the older you are, the more you can deduct).

One important note: Seniors only get this deal for the 2016 tax year. Starting with the 2017 tax year, the threshold is 10% for everyone.

4. A safety net for selling that empty nest

This tax deduction is available to everyone regardless of age, but it’s especially useful if you’re itching to sell your house and downsize in retirement. The IRS lets you exclude from your income up to $250,000 of capital gains on the sale of your house. That’s if you’re single; the exclusion rises to $500,000 if you’re married.

So, if you bought that four-bedroom ranch house back in 1974 for $100,000 and sold it for $350,000 today, you likely won’t have to share any of that gain with Uncle Sam. There are a few conditions, though:

  • The house has to have been your primary residence.
  • You must have owned it for at least two years.
  • You have to have lived in the house for two of the five years before the sale, although the period of occupancy doesn’t have to be consecutive.
  • You haven’t excluded a capital gain from a home sale in the past two years.

5. More help if you’re disabled

You may qualify for a $3,750 to $5,000 tax credit, depending on your filing status, if you or your spouse retired on permanent and total disability. The credit, called the Credit for the Elderly or the Disabled, goes up to $7,500 if you’re 65 or older.

But be prepared for this one to give you a few gray hairs. First, few people qualify for the credit; most of the time, your Social Security benefits will cause you to exceed the income limits. And if you lived with your spouse during the year, you have to file jointly. Plus, the tax credit is nonrefundable, which means that if you owe $250 in taxes but qualify for a $5,000 credit, you won’t get a check from the IRS for $4,750. But at least you’ll get to enjoy a $0 tax bill.

Tina Orem is a staff writer at NerdWallet, a personal finance website.

“My mom is in a nursing home and I noticed some bruises and sores. I think they are bedsores—what should I do?”

Bedsores are often a sign of neglect and sometimes a sign of abuse. The first thing you should do is speak to a nurse on duty and begin to remedy the situation. Be aware that the nurse may not have a full understanding of these injuries and you will likely need the attention of a wound care specialist and medical doctor. If you have a cell phone take some pictures of the wound for documentation. Bedsores and Pressure Sores, also known as Decubitus Ulcers can progress quickly and can be deadly. They occur when someone is immobile and there is not adequate blood flow. Then the affected tissue dies and an ulcerated sore develops. In a nursing home, hospital or other care facility it is their responsibility to check and turn the patient regularly. There are laws in place that protect patients and you should know that these injuries are not the fault of the patient. The patient is the victim. If a loved one you know is suffering they may have a significant, financially rewarding lawsuit. Read more about this on our website, http://www.RaphanLaw.com.

As an Elder Law firm we see these cases often. Whether malpractice, abuse or neglect it is simply unjust for it to happen to an innocent victim. Do not put off addressing the issue. Call me for a free consultation (212-268-8200, 800-278-2960) or even to just guide you through the process of getting the proper medical and legal attention.

Visual Stages of Bedsores:

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Read our Frequently Asked Bedsore Lawsuit Questions here>

By Brian A. Raphan, Esq.

8 Pretty Good Things For Seniors To Remember at Tax Time

Tax day, which is April 18th in 2017, is approaching and it is time to begin crossing T’s and dotting I’s in preparation for paying taxes. As tax time draws near, you want to make sure you file all the proper forms and take all deductions you’re entitled to. Following are some things to keep in mind as you prepare your tax form.

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  1. Gifts. Did you give away any money this year? The gift tax can be very confusing. If you gave away more than $14,000 in 2016, you will have to file a Form 709, the gift tax return. This does not necessarily mean you will owe taxes on the money, however.
  2. Medical Expenses. Many types of medical expenses are tax deductible, from hospital stays to hearing aids. To claim the deduction, your medical expenses have to be more than 10 percent of your adjusted gross income.  (For taxpayers 65 and older, this threshold will be 7.5 percent through 2016.) This includes all out-of-pocket costs for prescriptions (including deductibles and co-pays) and Medicare Part B and Part C and Part D premiums. (Medicare Part B premiums are usually deducted out of your Social Security benefits, so be sure to check your 1099 for the amount.) You can only deduct medical expenses you paid during the year, regardless of when the services were provided, and medical expenses are not deductible if they are reimbursable by insurance.
  3. Parental Deduction. If you are caring for your mother or father, you may be able to claim your parent as a dependent on your income taxes. This would allow you to get an exemption $4,050 (in 2016) for him or her.
  4. Long-Term Care Insurance Premiums. Premiums for “qualified” long-term care policies are treated as an unreimbursed medical expense. Long-term care insurance premiums are deductible for the taxpayer, his or her spouse and other dependents.
  5. Social Security Benefits. Although Social Security benefits are generally not taxable, people with substantial income in addition to their Social Security may pay taxes on their benefits. If you file a federal tax return as an individual and your “combined income,” including one half of your Social Security benefits and nontaxable interest income is between $25,000 and $34,000, 50 percent of your Social Security benefits will be considered taxable. If your combined income is above $34,000, 85 percent of your Social Security benefits is subject to income tax.
  6. Home Sale Exclusion. Married couples can exclude from income up to $500,000 in profit on the sale of a home ($250,000 for single individuals). If a surviving spouse sells the home, he or she can still claim the exclusion as long as the house was sold no more than two years after the spouse’s death.
  7. Elderly or Disabled Tax Credit. Some low-income elderly or disabled individuals are entitled to a special tax credit. To be eligible, you must meet income limits. For more information, click here.
  8. Tax Refunds. Getting a federal tax refund should not affect your Medicaid or Social Security benefits. For a year after receiving a tax refund from the federal government, the refund will not be considered income or resources for SSI or Medicaid purposes. You can also transfer the refund within a year without incurring a penalty.

The IRS’s Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program offers free tax help to taxpayers who are 60 and older. For more information, click here. The IRS also publishes a Tax Guide For Seniors.

More Free Helpful Legal Guides for Seniors, click here.

Steps to Prevent a Contested Will

Emotions can run high at the death of a family member. If a family member is unhappy with the amount they received (or didn’t receive) under a Will, a Will contest may ensue. 

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Generally, only a person’s closest heirs, or “distributees” are able to contest a Will. Will contests can drag out for years, keeping all the beneficiaries from getting what they are entitled to. It may be impossible to prevent heirs from fighting over your Will entirely, but there are steps you can take to try to minimize squabbles and ensure your intentions are carried out.

Your Will can be contested if an heir believes you did not have the requisite mental capacity to execute the Will, someone exerted undue influence over you, someone committed fraud, or the Will was not executed properly.

The following are some steps that may make a will contest less likely to succeed:

  • Make sure your Will is properly executed. The best way to do this is to have an experienced elder law or estate planning attorney assist you in drafting and executing the will. Wills need to be signed and witnessed, usually by two independent witnesses.
  • Explain your decision. If family members understand the reasoning behind the decisions in your Will, they may be less likely to contest the Will. It is a good idea to talk to family members at the time you draft the will and explain why someone is getting left out of the Will or getting a reduced share. If you don’t discuss it in person, state the reason in the Will. You may also want to include a letter with the Will.
  • Use a no-contest clause. One of the most effective ways of preventing a challenge to your Will is to include a no-contest clause (also called an “in terrorem clause”) in the will. This will only work if you are willing to leave something of value to the potentially disgruntled family member. A no-contest clause provides that if an heir challenges the Will and loses, then he or she will get nothing. You must leave the heir enough so that a challenge is not worth the risk of losing the inheritance.
  • Prove competency. One common way of challenging a Will is to argue that the deceased family member was not mentally competent at the time he or she signed the Will. You can try to avoid this by making sure the attorney drafting the Will tests you for competency. This could involve seeing a doctor or answering a series of questions.
  • Remove the appearance of undue influence. Another common method of challenging a Will is to argue that someone exerted undue influence over the deceased family member. For example, if you are planning on leaving everything to your daughter who is also your primary caregiver, your other children may argue that your daughter took advantage of her position to influence you. To avoid the appearance of undue influence, do not involve any family members who are inheriting under your Will in drafting your will. Family members should not be present when you discuss the Will with your attorney or when you sign it. To be totally safe, family members shouldn’t even drive you to the attorney’s office.

Bear in mind that some of these strategies may not be advisable in certain states and certain situations. Feel free to talk to me about the best strategy for you.

(For more information on Wills click here.)

Regards,

Brian A. Raphan, Esq.

Is your family getting the VA support they deserve?

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Individuals who have risked their lives to serve and protect the United States of America and its citizens are entitled to a variety of benefits through the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Eligibility requirements vary for these benefits, but many veterans (and their family caregivers) are able to receive some level of coverage, financial assistance or support. This guide will help direct veterans and their family members to VA programs that may assist in paying for or providing long-term care, burials, pensions, and other benefits.

Get Your FREE Veterans Benefits Guide from AgingCare: Click Here

This guide includes the most up‑to‑date information on getting VA benefits.
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