How does a Health Care Proxy work?

 Health Care Proxy

A Health Care Proxy is someone you appoint to make health related decisions for you, in the event you can not.

Who decides that I’m not able to make my own healthcare decisions?

Your attending physician will decide whether you lack the capacity to make health care decisions. The decision is made in writing. A second doctor also must be consulted in the case of decisions to withdraw or withhold life-sustaining treatment.  You will be given notice of these decisions if there is any indication that you can understand it. If you object to this decision or to a decision made by your agent, your objection or decision will prevail unless a court determines that you are unable to make health care decisions.

What if I recover the ability to make my own healthcare decisions?

Your doctor is required to decide whether you can make your own health care decisions and confirm it in writing each time your doctor plans on acting on your agent’s health care decisions. If you have recovered the ability to make your own decisions, your agent will not be able to make any more decision for your unless you again lose the abilities to make them.

How do I complete a Healthcare Proxy?

In New York State, laws set forth the requirements for completing a health care proxy. You must be at least 18 years old and have the capacity to make your own decisions at the time you complete the proxy.

You must state your name and the name of the person you want to act as your agent, and state that your want the agent to have the authority to make health care decisions for you. You also must sign and date your health care proxy in the presence of two adult witnesses who are not names as your agent and have the witnesses sign the proxy. Please note that there are special rules for the execution of a proxy by residents of psychiatric facilities.

Please note that you do not need to have a lawyer draft your health care proxy, however, you may wish to consult with a lawyer for advice about a health care proxy.

DOWNLOAD A SAMPLE HEALTHCARE PROXY>

When will my Healthcare Proxy end?

You can create a proxy that lasts for a limited period of time by including in the document the dates you want the proxy to be valid. You can also revoke your proxy if you wish and you are competent to do so.

If you have appointed your husband or wife as your agent, and then you divorce or legally separate, the appointment will be revoked unless you specify that you do not wish to revoke it. You should review your proxy periodically to be sure that it continues to reflect your wishes.

Where should I keep my Proxy?

It’s best to give a copy of your proxy to your doctor as well as to the agent named in your proxy. If you revoke your proxy, be sure to notify whomever you gave a copy of the proxy. Upon entering a hospital you may give it to an administrator in charge, as your doctor, or attending physician may not be there when you arrive.

What if I don’t want a Healthcare Proxy?

You can’t be required to execute a health care proxy as a condition of receiving health care services or insurance. Also, the lack of a health care proxy or other specific instructions does not crate any presumptions regarding your wishes about health care.

For more information, contact me here>

Regards,

Brian

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Jury awards family $1 million in lawsuit against Beachwood nursing home

Mandatory sentencing laws keep U.S. judges' hands tied
The family of a former resident of Beachwood Pointe Care Center has won a $1 million lawsuit against the nursing home. (Eli Saslow, Washington Post)
By Bob Sandrick, special to cleveland.com 

BEACHWOOD, Ohio — A jury has awarded the family of a former Beachwood nursing home resident $1 million in a lawsuit filed more than two and a half years ago.

The resident, 71-year-old Mary L. Stevens, died in May 2012 at Beachwood Pointe Care Center on Chagrin Boulevard. She suffered infected pressure wounds, or bedsores, caused by “negligence and recklessness” of the nursing home staff, according to the lawsuit, filed in March 2013 by The Dickson Firm LLC in Beachwood.

The verdict came Wednesday in Cuyahoga County Common Pleas Court. The jury awarded David P. Lang, on behalf of Stevens, $560,000 in punitive damages and $440,000 in compensatory damages, according to the electronic court docket.

In addition to suffering from bedsores , Stevens also sustained “severe” and “fatal” injuries while at Beachwood Pointe, according to the lawsuit. Nursing home staff allowed her to become “very ill” and her condition deteriorated.

Beachwood Pointe did not tell Stevens’ family about her condition. Decisions about her medical care were made by non-medical staff, the lawsuit says, adding that the nursing home’s staffing levels and supervision were inadequate, and it failed to give Stevens palatable food.

Officials from Beachwood Pointe did not return calls Tuesday. Its attorney could not be reached about whether the nursing home would appeal the verdict.

More FAQs on Bedsore Lawsuits>

Free Downloads: Easy to read elder guides for families and seniors.

Probate, Estate Planning, Healthcare Proxies, Medicaid Planning, etc. Get informed and find many of the answers to your existing questions in these guides. Download and save as reference for free.

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Additional helpful articles>
Nursing Home Agreements: 

How to Manage Higher Health Insurance Costs in 2016

There are ways to mitigate the effects of cost increases.

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Via US NEWS & WORLD REPORT By Aug. 5, 2015

If you have health insurance, there’s a good chance you’ll pay more for it in 2016.

Health care and health insurance costs increase year to year, like most expenses. Since the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, growth in premiums has mostly slowed (as has the rise in health care costs overall), while your share of expenses – like deductibles – has increased. For several reasons, increases in both premiums and other out-of-pocket costs are expected in the coming year.

You can cope with these cost increases by understanding how they’ll happen and what you can do to mitigate their effects. How they affect you depends largely on where you get your insurance.

Employer-Based Health Insurance

About half of all Americans receive health insurance through an employer, less than in years past. Although having a job with health insurance is a perk, that doesn’t mean the benefit comes cheap.

Employer-based insurance premiums have grown relatively modestly over the past few years, according to Sabrina Corlette, senior research fellow and project director of Georgetown University’s Center on Health Insurance Reforms. This is due, in part, to slower growth in health care costs, but also because employers are shifting other costs to their workers, a practice known as “cost-sharing.”

For instance, the number of workers with a health insurance deductible grew from 55 percent in 2006 to 80 percent in 2014, and the average deductible more than doubled, from $584 for individual coverage to $1,217, according to the Kaiser Family Foundation. Further, more employers are offering only plans with high deductibles.

In 2016, if you receive your insurance through your job, you may see modest premium increases and are likely to see increased cost-sharing, like bigger deductibles.

Depending on the size of your employer, you will likely have a few plan options at open enrollment time, which is usually in the fall. Here are some tips for choosing the right health plan to help keep costs in check:

● Opt for a smaller provider network (HMO) or a high-deductible plan if you’ll feel the pinch in premiums. Both of these options could reduce your monthly costs. Remember, these plans have trade-offs. In an HMO, you have less freedom to go to the doctors of your choice. With a high-deductible health plan, you’ll cover more of your health care costs upfront until your insurance starts picking up the tab.

● Choose a higher premium plan like a PPO if the thought of that big deductible scares you. These plans may have higher monthly costs, but allow you greater freedom to visit the doctors you want without such high out-of-pocket expenses.

● Take advantage of health spending accounts no matter your plan choice. These accounts allow you to set aside pre-tax dollars for out-of-pocket medical expenses, and they’re usually taken directly from your paycheck. The two most common types are health savings accounts and flexible spending accounts. HSAs are available only to people with high-deductible plans, but have benefits over FSAs because you are able to carry your unused balance from year to year. With FSAs, if you don’t use the money you’ve allocated to the account, you’re likely to lose it at the end of the year.

“Marketplace”-Based Health Insurance

During the second open enrollment period of the ACA, an estimated 11.7 million people had selected or were automatically re-enrolled in health insurance plans on the federal and state marketplaces, according to the Department of Health and Human Services.

Recent media coverage of planned 2016 premium hikes refers to plans purchased by individuals on these health care exchanges. But these reports don’t tell the whole story.

“The data that’s out there about 2016 premiums is a little deceiving,” Corlette says. “And that’s because, in most states, the only rates that have to be posted right now are those that are proposed to be over 10 percent increases.” Insurance companies projecting more modest increases, therefore, don’t have to share that publicly, creating a skewed sample.

But, Corlette says, that doesn’t mean there won’t be premium increases. They’re driven largely by rising prescription drug costs, insurers having a clearer picture of their policyholders’ health care needs and the end of temporary “risk mitigation” programs that gave cash incentives to insurers for approving everyone.

In 2016, if you buy your insurance on state or federal health insurance marketplaces, you’re likely to see both increased premiums and cost-sharing. But unlike employer-based coverage, increased premiums on these plans are often offset by subsidies.

The solution, as with employer coverage, lies in shopping carefully.

● Reapply for the premium tax credit or health care subsidies. The Department of Health and Human Services estimates 87 percent of people purchasing marketplace plans receive this financial assistance to help lower premium costs. Updating your income information each year will ensure you’re getting the maximum allowable benefit.

● Be flexible and willing to part with your current plan. As costs change, the government may label another marketplace plan the “benchmark,” or the plan to which subsidy amounts are tied. If the price of your current plan goes up and another goes down, that lower-priced option may be deemed the benchmark. By switching plans, you’ll likely avoid cost increases altogether.

“The subsidy is almost like a gift card,” Corlette says. “So if you take it and stay in your same plan, even though that plan has gone up, yes, you’ll be paying more. But if you take it and go shop for a lower-priced plan, you should be fine.”

● Apply for Medicaid or CHIP coverage if you have children. If you make too much to qualify for Medicaid, your children could still be eligible for it or for The Children’s Health Insurance Program. Both are designed to provide health insurance to children at no or low cost. Eligibility varies by state, income and family size. In some states, children in a family of four could be eligible even if the household adjusted gross monthly income is as much as $6,000 or $7,000.

Stay Calm

When you’re reading about potentially dramatic health care cost increases, 2016 doesn’t seem so far off. Take this time to understand what is and isn’t working for you on your current plan and what your other options are. This way, when open enrollment comes around, you’re prepared to make savvy decisions about your health care.

‘Smart bandage’ detects bedsores before they are visible to doctors

BERKELEY — Engineers at UC Berkeley are developing a new type of bandage that does far more than stanch the bleeding from a paper cut or scraped knee.

Thanks to advances in flexible electronics, the researchers, in collaboration with colleagues at UC San Francisco, have created a new “smart bandage” that uses electrical currents to detect early tissue damage from pressure ulcers, or bedsores, before they can be seen by human eyes – and while recovery is still possible.

Associate professor Michel Maharbiz explains how the smart bandage works to detect bedsores. (UC Berkeley video by Roxanne Makasdjian and Phil Ebiner)

“We set out to create a type of bandage that could detect bedsores as they are forming, before the damage reaches the surface of the skin,” said Michel Maharbiz, a UC Berkeley associate professor of electrical engineering and computer sciences and head of the smart-bandage project. “We can imagine this being carried by a nurse for spot-checking target areas on a patient, or it could be incorporated into a wound dressing to regularly monitor how it’s healing.”

The researchers exploited the electrical changes that occur when a healthy cell starts dying. They tested the thin, non-invasive bandage on the skin of rats and found that the device was able to detect varying degrees of tissue damage consistently across multiple animals.

The smart bandage is fabricated by printing gold electrodes onto a thin piece of plastic. This flexible sensor uses impedance spectroscopy to detect bedsores that are invisible to the naked eye. (Image courtesy of UC Berkeley)
The smart bandage is fabricated by printing gold electrodes onto a thin piece of plastic. This flexible sensor uses impedance spectroscopy to detect bedsores that are invisible to the naked eye. (UC Berkeley image)

Tackling a growing health problem

The findings, published today (Tuesday, March 17) in the journal Nature Communications, could provide a major boost to efforts to stem a health problem that affects an estimated 2.5 million U.S. residents at an annual cost of $11 billion.

Pressure ulcers, or bedsores, are injuries that can result after prolonged pressure cuts off adequate blood supply to the skin. Areas that cover bony parts of the body, such as the heels, hips and tailbone, are common sites for bedsores. Patients who are bedridden or otherwise lack mobility are most at risk.

“By the time you see signs of a bedsore on the surface of the skin, it’s usually too late,” said Dr. Michael Harrison, a professor of surgery at UCSF and a co-investigator  of the study. “This bandage could provide an easy early-warning system that would allow intervention before the injury is permanent. If you can detect bedsores early on, the solution is easy. Just take the pressure off.”

Bedsores are associated with deadly septic infections, and recent research has shown that odds of a patient dying are 2.8 times higher when they have pressure ulcers. The growing prevalence of diabetes and obesity has increased the risk factors for bedsores.

“The genius of this device is that it’s looking at the electrical properties of the tissue to assess damage. We currently have no other way to do that in clinical practice,” said Harrison. “It’s tackling a big problem that many people have been trying to solve in the last 50 years. As a clinician and someone who has struggled with this clinical problem, this bandage is great.”

Cells as capacitors and resistors

The researchers printed an array of dozens of electrodes onto a thin, flexible film. They discharged a very small current between the electrodes to create a spatial map of the underlying tissue based upon the flow of electricity at different frequencies, a technique called impedance spectroscopy.

Researchers varied the amount of pressure applied to the skin, creating bedsores ranging in severity. The orange hexagon marks where the bandage was placed on the skin, and the dotted blue circle highlights where pressure was applied to the tissue. The "reversible damage" example highlights sensitivity of the "smart bandage" impedance sensor since the wound is not visible at the surface of the skin. (Schematic courtesy of UC Berkeley)
Researchers varied the amount of pressure applied to the skin, creating bedsores ranging in severity. The orange hexagon marks where the bandage was placed on the skin, and the dotted blue circle highlights where pressure was applied to the tissue. The “reversible damage” example highlights the sensitivity of the “smart bandage” impedance sensor since the wound is not visible at the surface of the skin. (Schematic courtesy of UC Berkeley)

The researchers pointed out that a cell’s membrane is relatively impermeable when functioning properly, thus acting like an insulator to the cell’s conductive contents and drawing the comparison to a capacitor. As a cell starts to die, the integrity of the cell wall starts to break down, allowing electrical signals to leak through, much like a resistor.

“Our device is a comprehensive demonstration that tissue health in a living organism can be locally mapped using impedance spectroscopy,” said study lead author Sarah Swisher, a Ph.D. candidate in electrical engineering and computer sciences at UC Berkeley.

To mimic a pressure wound, the researchers gently squeezed the bare skin of rats between two magnets. They left the magnets in place for one or three hours while the rats resumed normal activity. The resumption of blood flow after the magnets were removed caused inflammation and oxidative damage that accelerated cell death. The smart bandage was used to collect data once a day for at least three days to track the progress of the wounds.

The smart bandage was able to detect changes in electrical resistance consistent with increased membrane permeability, a mark of a dying cell. Not surprisingly, one hour of pressure produced mild, reversible tissue damage while three hours of pressure produced more serious, permanent injury.

Promising future

“One of the things that makes this work novel is that we took a comprehensive approach to understanding how the technique could be used to observe developing wounds in complex tissue,” said Swisher. “In the past, people have used impedance spectroscopy for cell cultures or relatively simple measurements in tissue. What makes this unique is extending that to detect and extract useful information from wounds developing in the body. That’s a big leap.”

Maharbiz said the outlook for this and other smart bandage research is bright.

“As technology gets more and more miniaturized, and as we learn more and more about the responses the body has to disease and injury, we’re able to build bandages that are very intelligent,” he said. “You can imagine a future where the bandage you or a physician puts on could actually report a lot of interesting information that could be used to improve patient care.”

Other lead researchers on the project include Vivek Subramanian and Ana Claudia Arias, both faculty members in UC Berkeley’s Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences; and Shuvo Roy, a UCSF professor of bioengineering. Additional co-authors include Amy Liao and Monica Lin, both UC Berkeley Ph.D. students in bioengineering; and Yasser Khan, a UC Berkeley Ph.D. student in electrical engineering and computer sciences, who fabricated the sensor array.

Study co-author Dr. David Young, UCSF professor of surgery, is now heading up a clinical trial of this bandage.

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To learn about other bedsore and pressure sore treatments click here.

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To Collect Debts, Nursing Homes Are Seizing Control Over Patients

The need to protect your assets is always at hand. Planning for long-term care with an elder law attorney can help protect your assets for the in home spouse and heirs. Medicaid Planning or Life Care Planning helps to ensure that you or your loved one get the best possible long-term care and the highest possible quality of life, whether at home, in an assisted living facility, or in a nursing home. The following article brings this issue to light.

Article via The New York Times: 

Photo credit: Piotr Redlinski for The New York Times

To Collect Debts, Nursing Homes Are Seizing Control Over Patients.

Lillian Palermo tried to prepare for the worst possibilities of aging. An insurance executive with a Ph.D. in psychology and a love of ballroom dancing, she arranged for her power of attorney and health care proxy to go to her husband, Dino, eight years her junior, if she became incapacitated. And in her 80s, she did.

Mr. Palermo, who was the lead singer in a Midtown nightclub in the 1960s when her elegant tango first caught his eye, now regularly rolls his wife’s wheelchair to the piano at the Catholic nursing home in Manhattan where she ended up in 2010 as dementia, falls and surgical complications took their toll. He sings her favorite songs, feeds her home-cooked Italian food, and pays a private aide to be there when he cannot.

Lack of Personal Care Agreement Makes Reimbursements to Relatives an Improper Transfer

Reversing a trial court, a Louisiana appeals court determines that a nursing home resident improperly transferred close to $50,000 to his caregiver nephew and the nephew’s wife because the payments were not made pursuant to a valid personal care agreement.  David v. State of Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals (La. Ct. App., 1st, No. 2014 CA 0791, Dec. 23, 2014).

Brian Raphan, P.C.

Widley David entered a Louisiana nursing home in 2008.  Between 2008 and 2010, Mr. David wrote six checks to his nephew and his nephew’s wife totaling $49,195.  According to Mr. David, the checks were intended to repay his closest living relatives for the daily care that they provided him in the nursing home.  When Mr. David applied for Medicaid in December 2010, the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals (DHH) assessed a nearly 15-month penalty period due to the transfers.

Mr. David did not appeal the initial imposition of a penalty period, but in July 2011 he requested a change in status from private pay to full Medicaid pay.  DHH denied this request, stating that pursuant to the initial denial, Mr. David was ineligible for Medicaid until January 2012.  Mr. David appealed the denial of his change in status, arguing that the payments to his relatives were reimbursement for care provided and not to qualify for Medicaid.  DHH claimed that the payments would be valid only if made pursuant to a written personal care agreement, which Mr. David had never executed.  After a trial court found in favor of Mr. David, the state appealed.

The Louisiana First Circuit Court of Appeal reverses the trial court, finding that the lack of a personal care agreement made the transfers to the relatives improper.  The court states that a “payback arrangement or personal care agreement was necessary to validate this alleged arrangement; however, Mr. David did not offer any type of tangible or documentary evidence of an agreement, contract, or Personal Care Agreement to substantiate and validate his argument. The record is void of any evidence that complied with Medicaid eligibility requirements to validate the resource transfers.”

To read the full text of this decision, click here.

To learn more about Medicaid Planning click here.

Regards, Brian

5 Tips for Arranging and Paying for a Home Health Aide:

-By Emily Garnett, Associate Attorney at Brian A. Raphan, P.C.

Finding oneself or a family member in need of home care can be a tough pill to swallow. It is often difficult to accept that you or a loved one is no longer able to safely do many of the activities of daily living that you once could. At that point, it may be time to bring in a home health aide for assistance with a wide variety of activities of daily living.

1. How to Arrange Help and Payment: Many people choose to privately pay for home health aides. If you choose to go this route, you can utilize a long-term home health care program (LTHHCP). These are agencies accredited by the state that provide home health aides. They manage the staffing and payroll. However, you can also choose to select aides that are privately paid, and work outside of an LTHHCP agency. For these aides, you would have to manage staffing and payroll issues yourself, or utilize the expertise of an elder law attorney or geriatric care manager to manage these details.

Medicaid Planning

2. Using Medicaid to Pay: If you are unable to privately pay for home care, you have the option of applying for Medicaid to obtain coverage for long-term home care. It is advised that you work with an elder law attorney or other professional to facilitate this process, as it can be complicated, and the regulations are frequently changing. In order to qualify for Medicaid, the applicant must meet certain requirements for income and assets. The current Medicaid asset limit is $14,550.00, and the monthly income limit is $809.00. Unlike nursing home Medicaid, there is no look-back period for community Medicaid, meaning that Medicaid is not going to investigate past money transfers like they would for an application for nursing home coverage. There are several ways to address the income and asset limits required for Medicaid acceptance, the most common being the use of pooled trusts to shelter those funds. Pooled trusts are frequently used to meet the Medicaid spend-down, which is the requirement that an applicant reduce his or her available income so that it remains under the Medicaid limit.

3. Shelter your Income: Once an individual applies for Medicaid coverage, he or she can join a third party pooled trust to shelter the excess income and meet the spend-down. These trusts allow the individual to use the funds sheltered in the trust for personal needs outside of the Medicaid coverage, including expenses like rent, utilities, and phone bills. If this arrangement is not made, the applicant runs the risk of rejection by Medicaid or having to privately pay for some part of his or her home care each month.

4. Enrollment for Managed Long Term Care: Once you have applied for and been approved for Medicaid, you will work with your elder law attorney or specialist to enroll in a managed long-term care program (MLTC), which will provide home care services. The first step in this process is assessment by a new program, the Conflict-Free Eligibility and Enrollment Center (CFEEC), sometimes also referred to as “Maximus”. This assessment takes about two hours and provides a determination to Medicaid that the consumer is eligible for home care services. At that point, the consumer selects a managed long term care plan to enroll in. The MLTC plan then schedules a second assessment, also lasting about two hours, in which the specific care needs of the consumer are assessed. At the conclusion of this assessment, the nurse performing the assessment will submit the information to Medicaid, who will ultimately determine the number of hours of home care needed each day by the consumer. This process is very time-sensitive, so work closely with your Medicaid attorney assisting with the application process, to avoid costly and unnecessary delays.

5. Keeping Your Ongoing Benefits: Once the application process is complete, your home care will likely start on or around the first of the following month. At that point, your obligations as a consumer are to maintain the income and asset limits, including utilization of a pooled trust if needed. You will be required to annually re-certify with Medicaid that you have maintained these levels. Should you have questions at that point, please don’t hesitate to reach out to your Medicaid planning attorney, rather than risk losing your Medicaid benefits. It is worth noting, however, that occasionally delays arise in various points of the application process through no fault of the attorney or applicant. Should you find yourself in such a position, understand that these issues do arise, and make sure to cooperate with your attorney or specialist’s advocacy efforts towards resolution.

Emily Garnett, Esq.

The Law Offices of Brian A. Raphan, P.C. 7 Penn Plaza, Suite 810 New York, NY 10001 T: (212) 268-8200

“Helping Senior New Yorkers for over 25 Years”

New Federal Regulations May Increase Pay for Home Care Workers, But Could Harm Seniors and People with Disabilities…

A federal regulation scheduled to go into effect on January 1, 2015, could force employers to pay previously exempt caregivers the federal minimum wage and time-and-a-half for overtime.  While this may seem like a good deal for the caregivers, it could result in cutbacks to services for seniors and people with disabilities if states limit caregiver hours in response to the new regulations.

medicaid planning, appeal

Congress initially passed the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) in 1938 to give most workers a guaranteed minimum wage and overtime protection.  The original FLSA did not apply to many domestic workers hired directly by households, so in 1974 Congress amended the FLSA to cover many people who work in private households.  However, the 1974 amendment did not apply to “companionship” workers who assist elderly patients or people with disabilities, and it also stated that live-in domestic workers were not entitled to overtime pay.

In 2013, the Department of Labor issued a final regulation altering these rules for the first time since 1974.  The new regulation, which goes into effect on January 1st, narrows the definition of “companionship” services and requires third-party employers like home health care agencies to meet all minimum wage and overtime laws for all employees.

Under the new rules, an employee qualifies as a “companionship” worker only if he spends less than 20 percent of his work time assisting a senior or person with disabilities with activities of daily living or instrumental activities of daily living.  In addition, if the worker provides any medically necessary services, then he is not engaged in “companionship” work.  In all cases, if the employee is not considered a companion, then he must be paid the minimum age and must receive overtime pay.  These rules apply only to workers employed by the senior, person with disabilities or her household.  If the worker is employed by a third party, or in many cases if the worker is employed by both the person with disabilities and a third party (like a state agency), then he will always be subject to minimum wage and overtime rules, even if he is a live-in employee who would typically not be subject to overtime rules.

Although the new regulations could mean more money for caregivers who may not currently receive minimum wage or overtime protection, there could also be some negative consequences for consumers and caregivers.  Since many state agencies are now going to be considered third-party employers, they may implement their own regulations limiting the number of hours that caregivers can work in order to avoid being out of compliance with these new federal rules.  This could lead to reduced services for people who need them and fewer hours for caregivers.

According to an advocacy fact sheet from the National Senior Citizens Law Center, only California has addressed these concerns in its 2014-2015 budget, which leaves most seniors and people with disabilities in limbo as the January 1st implementation deadline approaches.

For more on this complicated problem, you can view an assortment of materials on the Department of Labor’s website here and download the National Resource Center for Participant-Directed Services’ toolkit here.

Regards, Brian

New Lawsuits for Pharmaceutical side effects & Medical Devices

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Our firm has become aware of concerning pharmaceutical and medical device side effects that may have impacted you, a friend or family member. If you or a loved one has been affected by any of these drugs or devices, please feel free to contact us to learn more about your legal rights and a possible monetary settlement. After receiving calls for legal help from some of our clients we are now working with a national law firm who specializes in litigation against large manufacturers of these products in an effort to hold them accountable for failing to warn patients of dangerous side effects. Below is a list of drugs and devices:

Xarelto—this medication is a blood thinner that can lead to serious and uncontrollable internal bleeding.

Testosterone Supplements–can bring on a heart attack or stroke, or cause deep vein thrombosis, DVT, blood clots, pulmonary embolism.

Risperdal—is an anti-psychotic medication marketed for use in children with ADD and other behavior disorders and is known it cause breast growth in prepubescent males, a condition known as gynecomastia.

Bard Inferior Vena Cava Filters—these devices are intended to stop blood clots traveling from the lower body to the heart and/or lungs, however they can break off and migrate into the heart, lungs, and other vital organs resulting in serious injury or death.

Potiga—is a seizure epilepsy medication that can cause blindness and other eye problems in patients.

Benicar—prescribed to treat high blood pressure, this drug has been linked to a serious gastrointestinal condition known as sprue-like enteropathy; symptoms include excessive weight loss or chronic diarrhea.

We can help you and your loved ones with any legal matters arising from use of these dangerous drugs and medical devices. If you know of someone that has used these medications please forward the information and inform them of the dangers.

If you have any questions feel free to contact me. -Brian