Ooops! Did you choose the wrong executor?

You finally got around to making your Will. You deserve a sigh of relief. But did you choose the right executor? Or have you burdened an unqualified or unwilling relative and put your Will at risk to be contested?

Generally speaking, the first person that comes to mind to be one’s executor is often an adult child or other family member, followed perhaps by a close friend. These individuals may be honored that you asked them, and will often accept this important duty. Some may even accept the duty despite not wanting the burden, just so they do not insult you.

Your choice of executor may be an emotional one, but also should be chosen based upon what is best for your estate, probate, and your needs. Choosing the executor of your estate is not a task to take lightly. An executor is the person responsible for managing the administration of a deceased individual’s estate. The time and effort involved will vary with the size of the estate. Even the executor of a small estate will have important duties that must be performed correctly, or the executor may be personally liable to the estate or the beneficiaries. One of the many jobs of the executor is to take an accurate inventory of the deceased individual’s assets. This includes making a list of all bank, brokerage and retirement accounts, insurance policies, real property, and any other assets the deceased owned. An inventory of personal effects, antiques or other valuables must be tabulated as well. A list of the estate’s inventory must ultimately be presented to the probate court for review.

This can be a very time-consuming task, and it may mean going through the deceased individual’s personal data or paperwork for information, interviewing heirs, or checking ownership documents at the local town hall. The information presented to the court is expected to be accurate and complete, so that the beneficiaries receive their inheritance on a timely basis. Of course, the executor must probate the deceased person’s Last Will, which may involve locating and notifying the person’s heirs. As if the demands of the probate process aren’t enough work, creditors must be paid, and final income tax returns must be filed. If the estate is large enough, a state and federal estate tax return may be required as well. Once this is complete, distributions to the estate’s beneficiaries must be calculated and dispersed. Of course, if the deceased person’s Last Will is contested, the executor must oversee this process as well. This may put an additional wedge between friends and/or family members. Further, it can add months and perhaps even years to the process, as well as some unwanted stress for the executor.

Tax laws and state and federal estate tax exclusion rates may be different than when the Will was written. If the surviving spouse plans to file for estate tax portability, an estate tax return may need to be filed even if no tax is owed.

Feel free to call me for an opinion on your choice of executor. If you prefer, I may also act as your executor if you do not have a qualified person in mind. This may remove the potential burden it can place on others and offer many efficiencies and time saving as well.

To learn more about the duties of an executor click here>

Regards,

Brian

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Bedsores Reference Guide: Lawsuit, Medical, and Treatment information

Have bedsores reached epidemic proportions yet? To many it seems so — especially in elders that are in hospitals and nursing homes — and they do not have to be incapacitated or totally immobile to be at risk.

Whether or not you or an elder in your family has unfortunately become a victim of a bedsore, pressure ulcer, or decubitus ulcer keep this handy reference guide available. Download it to you computer, cell phone or bookmark it. Because bedsores can happen extremely fast and catch you off guard. They can progress rapidly, even within hours if proper care and medical attention are not given.

Anyone with an elder family member entering a hospital, nursing home or even a skilled nursing facility for a short term stay should read and help prevent these potential life treating wounds from happening to a loved one. They can occur at even the best hospitals with the best doctors. You may not expect malpractice, but it happens. You may not expect neglect but it happens. It happens to tens of thousands of innocent patients.

Lawsuits can yield millions of dollars to the victim and their family.

Understaffing, inadequate training, changes in shifts, or simply a scenario where your loved one in a nursing home may need care but that care is given to others with a more acute immediate need. It’s at these times that the elder is at extreme risk.

You can read more about risk factors, treatment, and lawsuits to be compensated for pain, suffering or loss of life here. Reference Guide>

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Additional information on bedsores from Medical News Today>

More Facts About Your Legal Rights>

Benefits for Older New Yorkers

Many public programs are available to seniors in need.  The New York City Department for the Aging (DFTA) provides a guide to benefits and entitlements for older New Yorkers.

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Most of the agencies listed have automated answering systems needing touch tone responses from the caller. There may be a waiting time of up to several minutes, depending on the agency. The time may be longer to reach an operator, if using a rotary telephone.

ACCESSNYC can help improve your access to benefits. ACCESSNYC is a free electronic information and screening tool that allows people of all ages to identify and screen their eligibility for over 30 City, State and Federal human service benefit programs.

Seniors can visit http://www.nyc.gov and search for “Access NYC” to screen their eligibility for several of the programs listed in this booklet. These include SNAP, Medicaid, HEAP, and the Senior Citizen’s Rent Increase Exemption and Veterans’ Exemptions.

Based on information you enter into the system, ACCESS NYC will help fill out some of the applications to make the process easier. It will also provide information on agency office locations that are near you. The tool is available in seven languages: English, Spanish, Chinese, Russian, Korean, Haitian Creole, and Arabic.

Download The NYC.gov Benefits Guide here: http://www.nyc.gov/html/dfta/downloads/pdf/publications/Benefits1017.pdf

For more information call 311 or visit: www.nyc.gov

 

Pressure sores: Causes, treatment, and prevention

Informative medical information: 

Via MEDICAL NEWS TODAY, By Christian Nordqvist

Pressure sores can affect people who spend a long time in one position, for example, because of paralysis, illness, old age, or frailty.

Also known as pressure ulcers and bedsores, pressure sores can happen when there is friction or unrelieved pressure on one part of the body.

People who cannot make even small movements are at risk of pressure sores.

The sores can affect any part of the body, but the bony areas around the elbows, knees, heels, coccyx, and ankles are more susceptible.

Bedsores are treatable, but, if treatment comes too late, they can lead to fatal complications.

The prevalence of pressure sores in intensive care units in the United States (U.S.) is estimated to range from 16.6 percent to 20.7 percent.

Fast facts on pressure soresHere are some key points about pressure sores. More detail and supporting information is in the main article.

  • Pressure sores, pressure ulcers, or bedsores commonly affect people who cannot move easily.
  • They are more likely to affect the bony parts of the body.
  • The sores develop in stages. Identifying them in the early stage enables treatment and reduces the risk of complications.
  • Moving patients frequently is key to preventing pressure sores.

Symptoms

[Pressure sores]There are varying stages of severity of pressure sore.

Pressure ulcers can affect patients who are unable to move because of paralysis, illness, or old age.

Bed-bound patients are most at risk of developing bedsores on the bony parts of their body, such as the ankles, heels, shoulders, coccyx or tailbone, elbows, and the back of the head.

Patients who use a wheelchair have a higher risk of developing pressure sores on their:

  • buttocks and tailbone
  • spine
  • shoulder blades
  • back of arms or legs

Pressure sores develop in four stages.

  1. The skin will look red and feel warm to the touch. It may be itchy.
  2. There may be a painful open sore or a blister, with discolored skin around it.
  3. A crater-like appearance develops, due to tissue damage below the skin’s surface.
  4. Severe damage to skin and tissue, possibly with infection. Muscles, bones, and tendons may be visible.

An infected sore takes longer to heal, and the infection can spread elsewhere in the body.

Causes and risk factors

Anyone who stays in one place for a long time and who cannot change position without help is at risk of developing pressure sores. The ulcers can develop and progress rapidly, and they can be difficult to heal.

Sustained pressure can cut off circulation to vulnerable parts of the body. Without an adequate supply of blood, body tissues can die.

According to Johns Hopkins Medicine, a sore can develop if blood supply is cut off for more than 2 to 3 hours.

Pressure ulcers are usually caused by:

Continuous pressure: if there is pressure on the skin on one side, and bone on the other, the skin and underlying tissue may not receive an adequate blood supply.

Friction: For some patients, especially those with thin, frail skin and poor circulation, turning and moving may damage the skin, raising the risk of bedsores.

Shear: If the skin moves one way while the underlying bone moves in the opposite direction, there is a risk of shearing. Cell walls and minute blood vessels may stretch and tear.

This can happen if a patient slides down a bed or a chair, or if the top half of the bed is raised too high.

Injured tissue can develop an infection. This can spread, leading to serious illness.

Risk factors

[Pressure sores immobility]Pressure sores mainly affect those who are less mobile, or restricted to one position, such as older people or those with mobility impairments.

Pressure ulcers are more common among those who:

  • are immobilized because of injury, illness, or sedation
  • have long-term spinal cord injuries

Patients with long-term spinal cord injuries or neuropathic conditions, including diabetes, have reduced sensation.

They may not feel a bedsore developing, so they continue to lie on it, making it worse.

Patients who cannot move specific parts of their body unaided have a greater risk of developing pressure ulcers.

Factors that increase the risk include:

  • Older age as skin gets thinner and more vulnerable with age
  • Reduced pain perception, due, for example, to a spinal cord or other injury, as they may not notice the sore
  • Poor blood circulation, due to diabetes, vascular diseases, smoking, and compression
  • Poor diet, especially with a lack of protein, vitamin C, and zinc
  • Reduced mental awareness, due to a disease, injury, or medication, can reduce the patient’s ability to take preventive action
  • Incontinence of urine or feces can cause areas of permanently moist skin, increasing the risk of skin breakdown and damage

A low or high body mass index (BMI) increases the risk.

A person with a low body weight will have less padding around their bones, while those with obesity can develop sores in unusual places. Studies show that people with a BMI of 30 to 39.9 have a 1.5 times higher rate of developing pressure ulcers.

Diagnosis, treatment, and management

[Pressure sores relief]Placing a pillow under the affected area can help to alleviate pressure and symptoms.

A doctor will diagnose a pressure ulcer through a visual examination.

The physician will ask about recent medical history and they will check the size and shape of the sore, and if there is any oozing or weeping.

If the patient is not in residential care, a doctor may teach them how to carry out regular daily checks on themselves.

People should report any sign of a pressure sore to the doctor.

Treatment

Treating pressure ulcers is not easy.

An open wound is unlikely to heal rapidly. Even when healing does take place, it may be inconsistent, because of the damage to skin and other tissues.

Less severe pressure ulcers often heal within a few weeks with proper treatment, but serious wounds may need surgery.

The following steps should be taken:

  • Remove the pressure from the sore by moving the patient or using foam pads or pillows to prop up parts of the body.
  • Clean the wound: Minor wounds may be gently washed with water and a mild soap. Open sores need to be cleaned with a saline solution each time the dressing is changed.
  • Control incontinence as far as possible.
  • Remove dead tissue: A wound does not heal well if dead or infected tissue is present, so debridement is necessary.
  • Apply dressings: These protect the wound and accelerate healing. Some dressings help prevent infection by dissolving dead tissue.
  • Use oral antibiotics or antibiotic cream: These will can help treat an infection.

In the early stages, people may treat ulcers at home, but more severe ulcers will need dressing by a health care professional.

Negative pressure wound therapy

Also known as vacuum-assisted therapy, this procedure involves the attachment of a suction tube to the bedsore. The tube draws moisture from the ulcer, drastically improving the healing time and reducing the risk of infection.

Wounds heal within around 6 weeks at half the cost of surgery.

Surgery

Some bedsores may become so severe that surgical intervention is necessary.

Surgery aims to clean the sore, treat or prevent infection, reduce fluid loss, and lower the risk of further complications.

A pad of muscle, skin, or other tissue from the patient’s body is used to cover the wound and cushion the affected bone. This is known as flap reconstruction.

Prevention

Even with excellent medical and nursing care, bedsores can be hard to prevent, especially among vulnerable patients.

Preventing bedsores is easier than treating them, but this too can be challenging.

Tips to reduce the risk of a bed sore developing include:

  • moving the patient at least every 15 minutes for wheelchair users and at every 2 hours for people in bed
  • daily skin inspections
  • keeping the skin healthy and dry
  • maintaining good nutrition, to enhance overall health and wound healing
  • quitting smoking
  • exercises, even if they must be carried out in bed, with assistance, as they improve circulation.

Patients should mention any possible bed sores to their health care worker or doctor.

A physical therapist can advise on the most appropriate positions to avoid pressure sores.

Complications

[Pressure sores cellulitis]Cellulitis is a possible complication of bed sores.

Without treatment, bed sores can lead to serious complications.

Cellulitis is a potentially life-threatening bacterial infection of the skin, from the surface to the deepest layer of skin. Cellulitis can result in septicemia, or blood poisoning, and the infection can spread to other parts of the body.

Bone and joint infections can arise if a pressure ulcer spreads to the joints or bones. This can result in damage to cartilage and tissue, and a reduction in limb and joint function.

Sepsis, in which bacteria can enter through sores, especially advanced ones, and infect the bloodstream. This can lead to shock and organ failure, a life-threatening condition.

There is a higher risk of developing an aggressive Cancer in the skin’s squamous cells if the patient has bedsores.

Outlook

Stage 2 bedsores can heal within 1 to 6 weeks, but ulcers that reach stage 3 or 4 may take several months, or they may never heal, especially in people with ongoing health problems.

With the appropriate measures, patients and medical staff can significantly reduce the risk of developing pressure ulcers.

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Download: Bedsore Legal and Medical Facts Booklet>

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Be Aware of the Kiddie Tax Before Leaving an IRA to Children

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Grandparents may be tempted to leave an IRA to a grandchild because children have a low tax rate, but the “kiddie tax” could make doing this less beneficial.

An IRA can be a great gift for a grandchild. A young person who inherits an IRA has to take minimum distributions, but because the distributions are based on the beneficiary’s life expectancy, grandchildren’s distributions will be small and allow the IRA to continue to grow. In addition, children are taxed at a lower rate than adults—usually 10 percent.

However, the lower tax rate does not apply to all unearned income. Enacted to prevent parents from lowering their tax burden by shifting investment (unearned) income to children, the so-called “kiddie tax” allows some of a child’s investment income to be taxed at the parent’s rate. For 2017, the first $1,050 of unearned income is tax-free, and the next $1,050 is taxed at the child’s rate. Any additional income is taxed at the parent’s rate, which could be as high as 35 percent. The kiddie tax applies to individuals under age 18, individuals who are age 18 and have earned income that is less than or equal to half their support for the year, and individuals who are age 19 to 23 and full-time students.

If a grandparent leaves an IRA to a grandchild, the grandchild must begin taking required minimum distributions within a year after the grandparent dies. These distributions are unearned income that will be taxed at the parent’s rate if the child receives more than $2,100 of income (in 2017). In addition to IRAs, the kiddie tax applies to other investments that supply income, such as cash, stocks, bonds, mutual funds, and real estate.

If grandparents want to leave investments to their grandchildren, they are better off leaving investments that appreciate in value, but don’t supply income until the investment is sold. Grandparents can also leave grandchildren a Roth IRA because the distributions are tax-free.

For more information about leaving an IRA to grandchildren from Kiplinger, click here.

State Properly Valued Sale of Medicaid Applicant’s Life Estate…

life estates

An Ohio appeals court rules that the state correctly valued the sale of a Medicaid applicant’s life estate using the specific state Medicaid life estate law as opposed to the more general law on determining fair market value. Stutz v. Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (Ohio Ct. App., 3rd Dist., No. 15-17-02, Aug. 21, 2017).

Barbara Stutz owned a life estate in her property and her sons owned the remainder interest. She entered a nursing home and applied for Medicaid. The state approved the application but decided the life estate was an asset that must be valued. Ms. Stutz appraised the life estate at $2,000 and sold it to her sons for $1,800. The state determined that the correct life estate value was $24,941, and it imposed a penalty period on Ms. Stutz for an improper transfer of assets.

Ms. Stutz appealed, arguing that the state should have used the general definition of fair market value in state law, which defines fair market value as the going rate that property can be expected to sell for on the open market, to value her life estate. She presented evidence that local realtors and bankers valued her life estate at $2,000. Instead, the state used the state law that applies to Medicaid and life estates and ruled that $24,941 was the correct value. Ms. Stutz appealed to court, and the trial court affirmed the state’s decision.

The Ohio Court of Appeals, 3rd District, affirms, holding that the state properly valued the life estate. According to the court, “a specific statute prevails over a general statute,” so the state correctly used the life-estate-value statute rather than the general fair-market-value statute.

For the full text of this decision, go to: http://www.supremecourt.ohio.gov/rod/docs/pdf/3/2017/2017-Ohio-7287.pdf

For more on Medicaid Planning go to: http://www.raphanlaw.com/medicaid-planning-

A Medicaid Applicant’s Purchase of Life Insurance Policy Is Transfer for Less Than Market Value

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An Illinois appeals court rules that a Medicaid applicant’s purchase of a life insurance policy was a transfer for less than fair market value because the applicant did not receive any benefit from the policy. Moore v. State of Illinois (Ill. App. Ct., 4th Dist., No. 4-16-0414, April 11, 2017).

Nursing home resident Elda Buckley applied for Medicaid. On the same day, she purchased a whole life insurance policy for $15,000 that named Christine Moore as the beneficiary. The state approved Ms. Buckley’s Medicaid application, but it determined that the purchase of the life insurance policy was a transfer for less than fair market value and imposed a penalty period.

Ms. Buckley appealed, arguing that she purchased the life insurance policy for fair market value, so the transfer should not be subject to a penalty period. The state and the trial court affirmed the penalty period. Ms. Buckley appealed.

The Illinois Court of Appeal, 4th District, affirms, holding that the purchase of the life insurance policy was a transfer for less than fair market value because Ms. Buckley did not receive the benefit of the policy. According to the court, the “apparent purpose of [Ms.] Buckley’s purchase of the insurance policy, of which she would receive none of the proceeds, was to shelter assets from Medicaid while ensuring [Ms.] Moore received the benefits of her assets.”

For the full text of this decision, go to: http://www.illinoiscourts.gov/Opinions/AppellateCourt/2017/4thDistrict/4160414.pdf

 

READ THE TOP 8 MEDICAID PLANNING MISTAKES HERE>

Elder Abuse is a National Epidemic

Via Huffington Post…

When Helping Hurts

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Elder abuse is a national epidemic. Each year in the United States, an estimated 10 percent of older Americans are injured physically, debilitated emotionally, exploited financially and/or neglected — often by an adult child, spouse, other relative or caregiver. Elder abuse victims have a three-fold risk of death compared to their non-abused counterparts. Frequently, an elder is isolated, their mistreatment hidden.

In 2006, newspapers around the country headlined the story that Brooke Astor, the legendary New York City philanthropist and socialite, was financially exploited and neglected by her son and attorney. The case attracted national attention as her grandson, with the help of others, sought elder justice – first, by petitioning for guardianship to help his grandmother and those who were (also) helping her, and second, to help bring some of her perpetrators (his father included) to justice. The Elder Abuse Unit of the New York County’s District Attorney’s Office indicted and convicted Brooke Astor’s son and attorney. Elder justice was realized.

That is rare. Most of the millions of elder abuse victims, their suffering shrouded in silence, do not receive justice. Only one in 24 elder abuse cases are reported to authorities. What is not rare is that, despite an almost total lack of support or resources, family, friends and neighbors step up to help. Yet helping hurts, as confirmed by new findings of our research.

 

Staggering Number Know About Elder Mistreatment, Assist Victims, and Feel Distress

Along with colleagues at Cornell University, University of Toronto and Purdue University, we utilized Cornell University’s Survey Research Institute’s omnibus survey to learn about these concerned persons who step up for elder abuse victims — a population that had never been assessed. The survey results were recently released in The Gerontologist. They show that when findings are extended to the general population (U.S. Census Bureau, 2016), approximately 73 million adult Americans have had personal knowledge of a victim of elder mistreatment. Further, approximately 44 million adult Americans have become involved in helping an elder abuse victim. And for over 32 million adult Americans, just knowing about an elder abuse situation is generally highly stressful. Actually providing help to the victim tends to intensify this personal distress.

We need more research to understand what specific aspects cause this distress. We do know from conversations with concerned persons that the path to assisting elder abuse victims is often fraught with challenges. Concerned persons may witness the decline in the victim’s health and seek to obtain medical care, or provide what care they can themselves. They might feverishly focus efforts on trying to stop a financial exploiter from completely emptying bank accounts. They may try to lessen the victim’s despair. Often, they are often the only ones standing between the victim and the abuser, preventing the victim from slipping into total isolation.

Yet they are usually wholly unprepared for how this intervention might take a toll on they themselves. Relationships with friends they confide in and family may become strained, sometimes to the breaking point. They may suffer financial consequences. And seeing or confronting an abuser can be dangerous, so they personally risk becoming the target of abuse. Intervening can take real courage, and even more to remain involved. And it requires time, as elder abuse cases tend not to resolve quickly. It is not surprising that concerned persons can experience anguish, frustration and trauma. Yet like the victims they help, they are largely invisible: their deeds often not recognized, their needs unacknowledged.

 

Communities Can Help

What can communities do? A new program to be launched this spring in New York City is a beginning. The New York City Elder Abuse Center is launching a pilot helpline for concerned persons assisting elder mistreatment victims residing in New York City. Funded in part by the Fan Fox & Leslie R. Samuels Foundation, it will provide information, referrals and support. This is an important first step, but the need is great. Programs must be developed for concerned persons — and elder abuse victims — in every community. This will require support from foundations, private philanthropists, businesses and government. Brooke Astor fervently believed in a collectively expressed philanthropy, a

Elder abuse is a national epidemic. Each year in the United States, an estimated 10 percent of older Americans are injured physically, debilitated emotionally, exploited financially and/or neglected — often by an adult child, spouse, other relative or caregiver. Elder abuse victims have a three-fold risk of death compared to their non-abused counterparts. Frequently, an elder is isolated, their mistreatment hidden.

In 2006, newspapers around the country headlined the story that Brooke Astor, the legendary New York City philanthropist and socialite, was financially exploited and neglected by her son and attorney. The case attracted national attention as her grandson, with the help of others, sought elder justice – first, by petitioning for guardianship to help his grandmother and those who were (also) helping her, and second, to help bring some of her perpetrators (his father included) to justice. The Elder Abuse Unit of the New York County’s District Attorney’s Office indicted and convicted Brooke Astor’s son and attorney. Elder justice was realized.

That is rare. Most of the millions of elder abuse victims, their suffering shrouded in silence, do not receive justice. Only one in 24 elder abuse cases are reported to authorities. What is not rare is that, despite an almost total lack of support or resources, family, friends and neighbors step up to help. Yet helping hurts, as confirmed by new findings of our research.

 

8 Pretty Good Things For Seniors To Remember at Tax Time

Tax day, which is April 18th in 2017, is approaching and it is time to begin crossing T’s and dotting I’s in preparation for paying taxes. As tax time draws near, you want to make sure you file all the proper forms and take all deductions you’re entitled to. Following are some things to keep in mind as you prepare your tax form.

elder law nyc

  1. Gifts. Did you give away any money this year? The gift tax can be very confusing. If you gave away more than $14,000 in 2016, you will have to file a Form 709, the gift tax return. This does not necessarily mean you will owe taxes on the money, however.
  2. Medical Expenses. Many types of medical expenses are tax deductible, from hospital stays to hearing aids. To claim the deduction, your medical expenses have to be more than 10 percent of your adjusted gross income.  (For taxpayers 65 and older, this threshold will be 7.5 percent through 2016.) This includes all out-of-pocket costs for prescriptions (including deductibles and co-pays) and Medicare Part B and Part C and Part D premiums. (Medicare Part B premiums are usually deducted out of your Social Security benefits, so be sure to check your 1099 for the amount.) You can only deduct medical expenses you paid during the year, regardless of when the services were provided, and medical expenses are not deductible if they are reimbursable by insurance.
  3. Parental Deduction. If you are caring for your mother or father, you may be able to claim your parent as a dependent on your income taxes. This would allow you to get an exemption $4,050 (in 2016) for him or her.
  4. Long-Term Care Insurance Premiums. Premiums for “qualified” long-term care policies are treated as an unreimbursed medical expense. Long-term care insurance premiums are deductible for the taxpayer, his or her spouse and other dependents.
  5. Social Security Benefits. Although Social Security benefits are generally not taxable, people with substantial income in addition to their Social Security may pay taxes on their benefits. If you file a federal tax return as an individual and your “combined income,” including one half of your Social Security benefits and nontaxable interest income is between $25,000 and $34,000, 50 percent of your Social Security benefits will be considered taxable. If your combined income is above $34,000, 85 percent of your Social Security benefits is subject to income tax.
  6. Home Sale Exclusion. Married couples can exclude from income up to $500,000 in profit on the sale of a home ($250,000 for single individuals). If a surviving spouse sells the home, he or she can still claim the exclusion as long as the house was sold no more than two years after the spouse’s death.
  7. Elderly or Disabled Tax Credit. Some low-income elderly or disabled individuals are entitled to a special tax credit. To be eligible, you must meet income limits. For more information, click here.
  8. Tax Refunds. Getting a federal tax refund should not affect your Medicaid or Social Security benefits. For a year after receiving a tax refund from the federal government, the refund will not be considered income or resources for SSI or Medicaid purposes. You can also transfer the refund within a year without incurring a penalty.

The IRS’s Tax Counseling for the Elderly (TCE) Program offers free tax help to taxpayers who are 60 and older. For more information, click here. The IRS also publishes a Tax Guide For Seniors.

More Free Helpful Legal Guides for Seniors, click here.

Is your family getting the VA support they deserve?

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Individuals who have risked their lives to serve and protect the United States of America and its citizens are entitled to a variety of benefits through the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Eligibility requirements vary for these benefits, but many veterans (and their family caregivers) are able to receive some level of coverage, financial assistance or support. This guide will help direct veterans and their family members to VA programs that may assist in paying for or providing long-term care, burials, pensions, and other benefits.

Get Your FREE Veterans Benefits Guide from AgingCare: Click Here

This guide includes the most up‑to‑date information on getting VA benefits.
  • BONUS: Caregivers’ Newsletter subscription

About AgingCare.com

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