NY Court Rules that Community Spouse’s Refusal to Contribute to Care Creates Implied Contract to Repay Benefits

medicaid planning, appeal
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A New York trial court enters judgment against a woman who refused to contribute to her spouse’s nursing home expenses, finding that because she had adequate resources to do so, an implied contract was created between her and the state entitling the state to repayment of Medicaid benefits it paid on the spouse’s behalf. Banks v. Gonzalez (N.Y. Sup. Ct., Pt. 5, No. 452318/15, Aug. 8, 2016).

Evelyn Gonzalez’ spouse was admitted to a nursing home and received $28,235.56 in Medicaid benefits from the Department of Social Services of the City of New York.  At the time of her spouse’s Medicaid application, Ms. Gonzalez’ assets exceeded the community spouse resource allowance.  However, she signed a declaration refusing to make her income or resources available to pay for her spouse’s care.

After a letter to Ms. Gonzalez demanding repayment of the cost of Medicaid benefits paid on behalf of her spouse went unanswered, the agency filed suit.  Ms. Gonzalez did not respond to the summons and complaint nor to the agency’s motion for default judgment.

The Supreme Court of New York, New York County, grants the motion and enters default judgment against Ms. Gonzalez for the cost of benefits provided to her spouse.  The court notes that in cases such as this where Ms. Gonzalez has the income and resources but refuses to contribute to her spouse’s care, state law creates an implied contract between her and the state allowing recovery of the cost of the benefits provided during the preceding 10 years.

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Should My Parents Give Me Their Home?

Many people wonder if it is a good idea to give their home to their children. While it is possible to do this, giving away a house can have major tax consequences, among other results.

When you give anyone property valued at more than $14,000 (in 2016) in any one year, you have to file a gift tax form.  Also, under current law you can gift a total of $5.45 million (in 2016) over your lifetime without incurring a gift tax. If your parents’ residence is worth less than this amount, they likely won’t have to pay any gift taxes, but they will still have to file a gift tax form

While your parents may not have to pay taxes on the gift, if you sell the house right away, you may be facing steep taxes. The reason is that when property is given away, the tax basis (or the original cost) of the property for the giver becomes the tax basis for the recipient. For example, suppose your parents bought the house years ago for $150,000 and it is now worth $350,000. If they give their house to you, the tax basis will be $150,000. If you sell the house, you will have to pay capital gains taxes on $200,000 — the difference between $150,000 and the selling price. The only way for you to avoid the taxes is for you to live in the house for at least two years before selling it. In that case, you can exclude up to $250,000 ($500,000 for a couple) of their capital gains from taxes.

Inherited property does not face the same taxes as gifted property. If you were to inherit the property, the property’s tax basis would be “stepped up,” which means the basis would be the current value of the property. However, the home will remain in your parents’ estate, which may have estate tax consequences.

Beyond the tax consequences, gifting a house to you can affect your parents’ eligibility for Medicaid coverage of long-term care.  There are other options for giving a house to children, including putting it in a trust or selling it to them. Before your parents give away their home, they should consult with your elder law attorney, who can advise them on the best method for passing on their home.

To read more articles about gifting from Brian A. Raphan, P.C. click here.

 

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Nursing Home Agreements: 

Medicaid Applicant’s Irrevocable Trust Is an Available Resource Because Trustee Can Make Distributions

medicare denial

An Alabama appeals court rules that a Medicaid applicant’s special needs trust is an available resource because the trustee had discretion to make payments under the trust. Alabama Medicaid Agency v. Hardy (Ala. Civ. App., No. 2140565, Jan. 29, 2016).

Denise Hardy inherited a one-half interest in a house and placed it in an irrevocable trust. The trust instrument stated that the trustee could distribute income to Ms. Hardy at the trustee’s discretion and that the trust was intended to be a special needs trust. Ms. Hardy entered a nursing home and applied for Medicaid. The state determined that the trust was an available resource.

Ms. Hardy appealed, and an administrative law judge agreed that the trust was an available resource. Ms. Hardy appealed to court, arguing that the trust was not available because it was irrevocable and could not be altered. The trial court reversed the state’s decision and ordered the state to pay Ms. Hardy benefits. The state appealed.

The Alabama Court of Civil Appeals reverses, holding the trust is an available resource. According to the court, a trust is an available resource if there is any circumstance under which payments can be made to the beneficiary, and that in this case, “if the house was sold and half of the proceeds of the sale were placed in the trust, the trustee could then make distributions as required by the terms of  [Ms.] Hardy’s trust.”

For the full text of this decision, go to: https://acis.alabama.gov/displaydocs.cfm?no=713449&event=4JX0KDU8D

8 Medicaid Planning Mistakes to Avoid: Click here

Additional Medicaid Planning questions? Click here

Regards,

Brian A. Raphan

 

Financial Abuse of the Elderly: Sometimes Unnoticed, Always Predatory

Caution to elders and family members of elders. This happens too often:

Via The New York Times 11/27/15 Elizabeth Olson

It was only after Mariana Cooper, a widow in Seattle, found herself with strained finances that she confessed to her granddaughter that she was afraid she had been bilked out of much of her savings.

Over three years, Ms. Cooper, 86, had written at least a dozen checks totaling more than $217,000 to someone she considered a friend and confidante. But the money was never paid back or used on her behalf, according to court documents, and in early November the woman who took advantage of Ms. Cooper, Janet Bauml, was convicted on nine counts of felony theft. (She faces sentencing on Dec. 11.)

Ms. Cooper, who lost her home and now lives in a retirement community, is one of an estimated five million older American residents annually who are victimized to some extent by a caregiver, friend, family member, lawyer or financial adviser.

With 10,000 people turning 65 every day for the next decade, a growing pool of retirees are susceptible to such exploitation. As many as one in 20 older adults

said they were financially mistreated in the recent past, according to a study financed by the Justice Department.

Traditionally, such exploitation, whether by family, friends or acquaintances, often has been minimized as a private matter, and either dismissed with little or no penalty or handled in civil court.

Even when the sums are large, cases like Ms. Cooper’s are often difficult to prosecute because of their legal complexity and because the exploitation goes unnoticed or continues for long periods. Money seeps out of savings and retirement funds so slowly it draws attention only after it is too late.

Ms. Cooper, for example, wrote her first check, for $3,000, in early 2008, and later gave Ms. Bauml her power of attorney. In early 2012, after Ms. Cooper realized that Ms. Bauml was not going to repay her in time for her to afford a new roof for her house, she told her granddaughter, Amy A. Lecoq, about the checks. She later called the police.

Ms. Bauml maintained that Ms. Cooper gave her money for services she provided as a home organizer or as loans.

Later, testing by a geriatric mental health specialist found that Ms. Cooper had moderate dementia, which showed her judgment had been impaired.

The diagnosis “helped the jury to understand why she would keep signing all these checks to this woman as loans when she was never being paid back,” said Page B. Ulrey, senior deputy prosecutor for King County, Wash., who pressed the case against Ms. Bauml.

The case was challenging in part because Washington State does not have an elder abuse statute, said Ms. Ulrey, who is one of a small but growing number of prosecutors around the country with the specific duty of prosecuting those who take financial advantage of elders, whether it is connected to investments, contracts or other fraud.

As the number of complaints grows, more municipalities are trying to combat such abuse, which is often intertwined with physical or sexual abuse, and emotional neglect.

Some organizations also have set up shelters, modeled on those for victims of domestic abuse. In the Bronx, for example, the Weinberg Center for Elder Abuse Prevention at the Hebrew Home in Riverdale started such a shelter in 2005. Since then, 14 other such shelters have been opened in various long-term care operations around the country to deal with urgent cases of financial abuse.

One such woman, who agreed to talk only if she was not identified by her last name, stayed at Riverdale after she was threatened with eviction. A neighbor discovered that the woman, a 73-year-old widow named Irene, had not paid her rent in six months because relatives living with her had been withdrawing money from her account and leaving her short of funds.

“I had to leave with one small suitcase,” Irene said. “They were abusing me.”

She was later able to move to federally subsidized housing away from the abusive situation.

To help elders in financial and other distress, more municipalities, using federal funds, are training law enforcement officers, prosecutors, and social workers how to spot the sometimes subtle signals that may indicate someone has been swindled.

“We see many cases where someone convinces an older person to give them the power of attorney, and then uses that authority to strip their bank accounts, or take the title of their home,” said Amy Mix, a lawyer at the AARP Legal Counsel for the Elderly, which works with the Adult Protective Services division in the District of Columbia government as well as the city’s police department.

In the most recent fiscal year, 934 cases of abuse were reported in Washington. About one-quarter of those were financial exploitation, according to Sheila Y. Jones, chief of Adult Protective Services. “And they involve millions of dollars,” she said.

But many cases are not counted officially because older people are reluctant to pursue legal remedies against relatives and friends. Louise Pearson, 80, a retired government computer analyst, declined to press charges against a security guard in her building who had befriended her and later obtained $30,000 from her savings.

“There was something about him you just had to take to,” Ms. Pearson said.

When she finally asked Malika Moore, a social worker at Iona Senior Services in Washington, for some assistance with her shaky finances, the social worker realized that the situation was serious.

One clue, she said, was that, “When I opened her refrigerator, it was empty.”

Ms. Moore was able to get Ms. Pearson home-delivered meals, and after the bank confirmed that she was missing savings, help to find a conservator to handle her money. Ms. Pearson, who now lives in a housing complex for the elderly, said, “I get money whenever I need it, and more than I did before.”

In Seattle, Ms. Cooper’s granddaughter expressed determination to educate others on the warning signs of financial abuse. “I wish we had known some of the red flags,” she said.

But even though she’s a trained social worker, it’s not surprising she missed the signs. She was deeply involved in caring for her mother, Ms. Cooper’s daughter, who was fighting cancer and died shortly before the period when her grandmother was writing the checks.

“Our family saw her regularly,” Ms. Lecoq said, “but we just didn’t see indications of what was going on.”

In retrospect, she might have been more suspicious with “my grandmother suddenly having a new friend and a friend who got so close so fast.”

Once Ms. Lecoq and her husband, John, recognized what had happened, they pushed for prosecution. Ms. Ulrey, the prosecutor, said the case required medical tests and search warrants for both the victim’s and the suspect’s financial accounts.

Ms. Cooper was unable to recover her lost money and worries about how long she will be able to pay for her retirement home. “She’s ashamed and embarrassed and feels guilty,” Ms. Lecoq said of her grandmother. “But I tell her: ‘You were a victim of a crime.’”

To help older people, families and friends should be on the lookout for some of the warning signs of financial abuse. These include not being able to cover normal expenses; paying for excessive, unexpected gifts to others; and signing over power of attorney or transferring property to unrelated individuals. 

To learn more about protecting the savings of the elderly and helping them avoid being exploited financially, these publications are worth reading: 

You may be signing away your right to sue the nursing home

By Michelle Andrews, Kaiser Health News

When Paul Ormond signed John Mitchell into a nursing home in Dennis, Mass., in June, he was handed a few dozen pages of admission papers. Ormond, Mitchell’s legal guardian and an old friend, signed wherever the director of admissions told him to.

He didn’t realize that one of those documents was an agreement that required Mitchell and his family to take disputes to a professional arbitrator rather than to court.

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Mitchell had been institutionalized since suffering a stroke in 1999. During a hospital stay early this summer, Mitchell, then 69, had received a tracheotomy and needed to switch to a nursing home that could accommodate him.

A few weeks after Mitchell arrived at the new nursing home, staff members dropped him while using a lift device to move him from his bed to his chair. Later that night Ormond, 63, got a call from the nursing home that Mitchell was unresponsive. Mitchell was rushed to the hospital, and doctors found that the fall had caused extensive bleeding on his brain. He died a few days later.

Mitchell’s sons hired a lawyer to look into the circumstances surrounding their father’s death. That was when Ormond learned that amid all the admissions papers he had signed was an arbitration agreement.

“I thought it was deceptive, and I was pretty angry that I’d been tricked into signing something that I didn’t know what it was,” says Ormond.

A mandatory arbitration agreement is an often overlooked document in the package of admissions papers at many nursing homes these days. It can have an outsize impact if something goes wrong. But anxious seniors or their caregivers often sign every document that’s put in front of them, perhaps only glancing at the content.

Signing an arbitration agreement means that in the event of a problem that is not amicably resolved — Mom slips on a wet floor and breaks her hip, say, or Dad wanders off the premises and gets hit by a car — you agree to bring the dispute before a professional arbitrator rather than file a lawsuit for negligence or wrongful death, for example.

Agreeing to arbitrate is generally not in families’ best interests, say consumer advocates. For one thing, it can be pricey. In addition to hiring a lawyer, the patient or family generally has to pay its share of the arbitrator’s fee, which may come to hundreds of dollars an hour, says Paul Bland, a senior attorney at Public Justice, a public interest law firm based in Washington.

“In court, you don’t have to pay the judge,” he says. “Our taxes pay for that.”

Court proceedings are also conducted in a public courtroom and leave a detailed public record that can inform industry practice and help develop case law, say experts. Not so with arbitration hearings, which are conducted in private and whose proceedings and materials are often protected by confidentiality rules.

The amount awarded — if any — may also be less if an arbitrator hears the case than it would be if a case went to trial, say experts.

Aon Global Risk Consulting analyzed 1,449 closed claims involving long-term-care providers between 2003 and 2011 and found that there was no money awarded in 30 percent of claims where a valid arbitration agreement was in place, compared with 19 percent of claims in which there was no arbitration agreement or the agreement was determined to be unenforceable.

Likewise, nearly 12 percent of claims without arbitration agreements resulted in awards of $250,000 or more, compared with 8.5 percent of claims with arbitration agreements.

The study was conducted with the American Health Care Association, which represents 11,000 long-term-care facilities. According to the report, “loss rates” — reflecting the dollar value of liability claims paid — are increasing 4 percent annually.

“Liability costs for providing care have grown and escalated” in recent years, says Greg Crist, a spokesman for the association. Arbitration agreements help keep a lid on those costs, he says.

That may explain why arbitration agreements have become much more common in nursing homes, experts say. The agreements are increasingly used in assisted living facilities as well.

Arbitration can also benefit patients and their families, Crist says. Claims are typically resolved more quickly than court cases, he says, so attorney costs are lower and patients can retain a larger portion of any financial settlement.

The Federal Arbitration Act, enacted in 1925, allows for two sides in a dispute to agree to binding arbitration to resolve their differences. If a dispute arises and an arbitration agreement is in place, the arbitrators are jointly selected by the patient and the nursing home.

Although consumers usually don’t realize it, there’s a simple way to avoid being forced into arbitration, say experts: Don’t sign the arbitration agreement.

What happens if you don’t sign? Nothing, Crist says. “It’s not a condition of admission to the facility,” he says. The American Health Care Association doesn’t support requiring people to sign an arbitration agreement as a condition of admission, he says, although practices may vary at individual nursing homes.

If you do sign and then wish you hadn’t, arbitration agreements typically have a 30-day “opt-out” provision that allows you to change your mind and retain your rights to sue.

The judge in John Mitchell’s wrongful death case threw out the agreement on the grounds that it was “unconscionable,”  a legal term used to describe contracts that are unfair or unjust.

“The judge agreed it was too much to expect me to digest all of this information at once, and that the arbitration clause hadn’t been explained thoroughly,” says Ormond. A trial date hasn’t yet been set.

Arguing that an agreement is unconscionable is one of the few ways people can extricate themselves from arbitration agreements once a dispute arises, says David Hoey, a North Reading, Mass., lawyer representing the Mitchell family. Another possibility is to prove that the person wasn’t competent to sign an agreement or that the family member who signed wasn’t legally qualified to do so.

Better yet, experts agree, is not to sign in the first place.

Related article: Should you sign that nursing home agreement:

Maybe it’s time for a geriatric care manager

Geriatric care

Why do we hear so much about geriatric care management these days? It’s because there are so many benefits they can provide to seniors and care givers. Let’s first clarify the term: A professional Geriatric Care Manager (GCM) is a health and human services specialist who helps families who are caring for older relatives. The GCM is trained and experienced in any of several fields related to care management, including nursing, gerontology, social work, psychology, and logistics of health care and often finances relating to the elderly. They are trained to assess, plan, coordinate, monitor and provide services for the elderly and their families. Although not lawyers, they are often aware of legal issues elders may be soon facing.

The benefits to you, the child or care giver of the elder range from saving time (vetting out various needs), saving money (knowing financial pitfalls of some decisions in advance), making better care decisions (with insight from someone who has seen it all) and most importantly –reducing stress.  The stress of being alone in the decision making process, relief of now being informed about your various options and what may be right for the specific needs of the elder, ranging from doctor decisions, how to provide care, assisted living, home care and nursing care options. Doing it alone takes an enormous amount of time, energy, resources and self reliance.

According to Gladys Harris Geriatric Care Manager of The Olive Group, you may need a Geriatric Care Manager if:

•    A person has limited or no family support available

•    Family has just become involved with helping the individual and needs direction regarding available senior services

•    A person has multiple medical or psychological issues

•    A person is unable to live safely in his / her current environment

•    Family is either “burned out” or confused about care solutions

•    Family has a limited time and / or expertise in dealing with loved one’s chronic care needs

•    Family is at odds regarding care decisions

•    Individual is not pleased with current care providers and requires advocacy

•    Individual is confused regarding his / her own financial and / or legal situation

•    Family needs education and / or direction in dealing with behaviors associated with dementia

Gladys is a recommended resource of ours and helps families and elders in New Jersey. They offer a unique combination of compassion, knowledge, a ‘can-do’ attitude and a wide range of services which also include:

Solution Focused Counseling: Life transitions are a common reason for counseling. We focus on empowering individuals to find solutions in their life by figuring out what a person’s goals are, and supporting them to find ways to achieve those goals.

Care Coordination: Our holistic assessment includes a physical, psychological and social functioning evaluation of the older adult, as well as a home safety inspection. Based on the assessment, we will develop a customized client care plan to identify private and public resources available to support the older adult. We coordinate the support systems needed to keep the older adult safe and happy at home.

Wellness Monitoring: Regular visits with the older adult to help ensure that they receive the best care available. During our visits we ensure older adults are receiving help with things that they want done, computer skills, organize photos, plan family events, etc.

Accessibility Issue Resolution: Aging-in-place often requires making changes to the home to help maintain independence.  This may be de-cluttering, home improvements, home safety inspection

Relocation Services: We support families during transitions from home to another location or facility.   These services include cleaning, de-cluttering, downsizing, and setting up in the older adult’s new home.

Cost savings is also a key component to good geriatric care management. You can learn more about it and find out more about the range of services by clicking here: www.TheOliveGroup.llc.com

Regards,

Brian

Can You Appeal If Medicare Refuses to Cover Care You Received?

Absolutely.  Sometimes Medicare will decide that a particular treatment or service is not covered and will deny a beneficiary’s claim. Many of these decisions are highly subjective and involve determining, for example, what is “medically and reasonably necessary” or what constitutes “custodial care.” If a beneficiary disagrees with a decision, there are reconsideration and appeals procedures within the Medicare program.

medicare denialWhile the federal government makes the rules about Medicare, the day-to-day administration and operation of the Medicare program are handled by private insurance companies that have contracted with the government. In the case of Medicare Part A, these insurers are called “intermediaries,” and in the case of Medicare Part B they are referred to as “carriers.” In addition, the government contracts with committees of physicians — quality improvement organizations (QIOs) — to decide the appropriateness of care received by most Medicare beneficiaries who are inpatients in hospitals.

If an intermediary, carrier or QIO decides Medicare shouldn’t pay for care you received, you will learn this when you receive your Medicare Summary Notice (MSN). The Medicare Rights Center recommends first making sure that the coverage denial isn’t simply the result of a coding mistake.  You can ask your doctor to confirm that the correct medical code as used.  If the denial is not the result of a coding error, you can appeal the denial using Medicare’s review process. Click here for details on this process.

Once Medicare’s review process has been exhausted, the matter can be taken to court if the amount of money in dispute exceeds either $1,000 or $2,000, depending on the type of claim. Medicare beneficiaries can represent themselves during these appeal proceedings, or they can be represented by a personal representative or an attorney. The Medicare Rights Center estimates that only about 2 percent of Medicare beneficiaries appeal denials of care, but 80 percent of those who appeal Part A denials and 92 percent who appeal Part B denials win more care.

 

Even if Medicare ultimately rejects a disputed claim, a beneficiary may not necessarily have to pay for the care he or she received. If a recipient did not know or could not have been expected to know that Medicare coverage would be denied for certain services, the recipient is granted a “waiver of liability” and the health care provider is the one who suffers the economic loss. In cases where this limited waiver of liability does not apply, however, the beneficiary is liable for any costs of care that Medicare does not cover. For example, a patient is financially responsible for any services normally provided under Medicare Part B if provided by a nonparticipating provider who did not “accept assignment” of the claim.

For more information email me at info@RaphanLaw.com or visit http://RaphanLaw.com. Or stay on top of these issues by subscribing to my free email Newsletters. Sample here… 

Regards, Brian

Using a No-Contest Clause to Prevent Heirs from Challenging a Will or Trust

If you are worried that disappointed heirs could contest your will or trust after you die, one option is to include a “no-contest clause” in your estate planning documents. A no-contest clause provides that if an heir challenges the will or trust and loses, then he or she will get nothing.

Last Will & TestamentA no-contest clause may be a good idea if you have a beneficiary who may be upset by the property distributed to him or her. However, no-contest clauses (also called in terrorem clauses) only work if you are willing to leave something of value to the potentially disgruntled heir. You must leave the individual enough so that a challenge is not worth the risk of losing the inheritance.

Most states allow no-contest clauses, but there may be restrictions. In many states, if the contest is based on probable cause or good faith, then the no-contest clause is unenforceable. That means that if the court determines there is a good reason for the contest, the clause won’t prevent the challenging heir from inheriting. In addition, a no-contest clause may apply to some portions of your estate plan, but not others. For example, your heirs may be able to challenge your executors without violating a no-contest clause.

Two states –Florida and Indiana — will not enforce no-contest clauses no matter what. If you write your will in a state that enforces no-contest clauses and then move to Florida or Indiana, the no-contest clause will be void.

If you include a no-contest clause in your estate plan, you need to be sure there are no mistakes. If you leave out important property or aren’t clear about property in your possession, your heirs could be completely disinherited if they try to fix any mistakes.

While a no-contest clause can be a good tool, there are other ways to discourage a will contest. To contact me about Wills or this info email: info@raphanlaw.com

To subscribe to my FREE Monthly newsletter, click here.

Regards, Brian

http://Raphanlaw.com

 

How to sell an inherited home:

 Get good advice before putting mom and dad’s house on the market.

Via  Amy Hoak, MarketWatch.

Selling an inherited house isn’t easy.

There’s the emotional aspect of getting a loved one’s home ready for sale — which likely includes clearing out his or her belongings and depersonalizing the rooms. There’s the financial cost of making necessary updates to attract buyers. Sometimes heirs have to deal with costly liens or other hidden problems, and there may be disagreements among siblings about the sale price.

And understandably, sometimes family members drag their feet. Images of growing up in the home with Mom and Dad prevent them from springing into action. They can’t let go.

“Everyone takes their time to deal with the passing of a loved one. And you need to take the appropriate steps to learn the market, educate yourself and have a Realtor and tax attorney who are reliable — you need someone who is going to be empathic and is there to help,” said Leslie Piper, consumer housing specialist for Realtor.com and a San Francisco real-estate agent.

Get some advice

First, learn about the house’s status and verify your ownership, getting the advice of an estate attorney, said David Fairman, a real-estate agent with ERA Solutions Realty in Central Ohio.

“Depending on state law, and other factors, a License To Sell Real Estate may be required from the Probate Court,” said Sally H. Mulhern, an attorney and founder of the law firm of Mulhern & Scott, PLLC, in Portsmouth, N.H., in an email interview. “In addition, there will most likely be a ‘creditor claims’ period, which must pass before assets, including real estate, can be distributed to the heirs.”

Connect with a tax adviser to understand any tax implications of selling the home, Fairman added. Heirs should also check and see if there are any liens on the property.

In fact, in certain situations — including when there are environmental concerns or the mortgage is underwater (meaning the home is worth less than what is still owed by the borrower) — heirs may even choose not to accept the home at all, allowing it to go into foreclosure, said Kelly Zinser, a bankruptcy attorney in California and legal analyst for Avvo.com, a site that rates lawyers and connects them with consumers.

Those who don’t want the property should speak with an attorney about disclaiming it — and promptly, Mulhern said. The process will likely involve filing disclaimer paperwork, she said.

Assess the market

It might be clear that Grandma’s kitchen needs some major upgrading. But before doing any work, contact a real-estate agent to help you understand the local housing market.

“You have to figure out what the other houses on the street are selling for, and get an idea of what the house is worth before improvements are made,” Fairman said.

A real-estate agent can also provide some advice on what changes would be worthwhile to make. From a financial perspective, it’s often best to do the minimum amount of repairs required to secure a buyer — and allow them to get financing. (Federal Housing Administration-backed mortgages, for example, require certain safety, soundness and security requirements for homes.) 

If the home is in very poor shape, it’s sometimes best to market it to an investor, Fairman added. Cash buyers looking for bargains are more likely to purchase a home “as is.”

In areas with a hot rental market, it may make sense to keep the property and rent it out. A local real-estate agent can help people sort through the options.

Prepare for listing

Success in selling the home — and for a desirable price — will often depend on its condition, and cleaning up the yard, painting the home’s interior and other minimal improvements will go a long way, Piper said. Upgrading flooring can also be helpful, as can minor improvements to the kitchen and baths, Fairman said.

Removing your loved one’s belongings will also make the home more appealing to the masses, both the ones who view photos online as well as those who do a walk through, Piper said. See Decluttering tips for boomers.

“Doing the cleanup is essential,” Piper said. It helps people view the home as a blank canvas.

If a home’s major mechanical systems are old, sellers might want to pay for a home warranty instead of replacing them, Fairman said. Buyers typically react positively to that incentive, he said.

Expect an emotional process

The process of selling a relative’s home is likely going to be emotional, from the sorting of the personal belongings to the finalization of the sale at the closing table. Expect that. And surround yourself with professionals who will be empathetic and helpful, Piper said.

Also, it will help to set expectations on what price you’d be willing to accept at the beginning of the process, Fairman said. That way, you can more rationally evaluate buyer offers, minimizing the chance of getting emotional over lower-priced bids. Clearly established expectations are especially important when multiple heirs are selling the home.

I hope you found this article informative!

Regards, Brian

https://twitter.com/NYCElderLawFirm

http://www.RaphanLaw.com

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