Advance Health Care Directives and Living Wills

Good info via HelpGuide.org

elder law news

Although death is an inevitable part of life, many of us are reluctant to face the fact that we’re not going to live forever and plan for our end-of-life care. Thinking about your end-of-life choices today can improve your quality of life in the future and ease the burden on your family. Discussing your wishes with loved ones and preparing an Advance Health Care Directive offers the best assurance that decisions regarding your future medical care will reflect your own values and desires.

What is an Advance Health Care Directive (AHCD)?

An Advance Health Care Directive (AHCD) is a generic term for a document that instructs others about your medical care should you be unable to make decisions on your own. It only becomes effective under the circumstances delineated in the document, and allows you to do either or both of the following:

  • Appoint a health care agent. The AHCD allows you to appoint a health care agent (also known as “Durable Power of Attorney for Health Care,” “Health Care Proxy,” or “attorney-in-fact”), who will have the legal authority to make health care decisions for you if you are no longer able to speak for yourself. This is typically a spouse, but can be another family member, close friend, or anyone else you feel will see that your wishes and expectations are met. The individual named will have authority to make decisions regarding artificial nutrition and hydration and any other measures that prolong life—or not.
  • Prepare instructions for health care. The AHCD allows you to make specific written instructions for your future health care in the event of any situation in which you can no longer speak for yourself. Otherwise known as a “Living Will,” it outlines your wishes about life-sustaining medical treatment if you are terminally ill or permanently unconscious, for example.

The Advance Health Care Directive provides a clear statement of wishes about your choice to prolong your life or to withhold or withdraw treatment. You can also choose to request relief from pain even if doing so hastens death. A standard advance directive form provides room to state additional wishes and directions and allows you to leave instructions about organ donations.

Read the full article here: http://www.helpguide.org/elder/advance_directive_end_of_life_care.htm

If you have any questions, feel free to email or call me.

Regards,

Brian

braphan@RaphanLaw.com

212-268-8200

http://www.RaphanLaw.com

 

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